Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2010

Abstract

The study analyzed the pretest-posttest results of high stakes test scores, absence frequencies, and high school eligibility cut scores of students who completed fourth-grade through eighth-grades in two academically equivalent but socioeconomically diverse same city Catholic schools. Study outcomes were compared for a naturally formed group of students (n = 28) who had completed fourth-grade through eighth-grades in an urban Catholic school representing fewer family socioeconomic advantages and 40% eligibility for free and reduced price lunch program participation and tuition assistance and a randomly selected group of students (n = 28) completing fourth-grade through eighth-grades in a suburban Catholic school representing greater family socioeconomic advantages and 2% eligibility for free and reduced price lunch program participation and tuition assistance. We reject hypothesized outcome differerences based on economic diversity and assert that when students of economic need continuously attend a standards-based school, over multiple years, that requires parental commitment and student engagement, guided by unity of purpose, socioeconomics does not determine academic destiny.

Comments

Published in the NCPEA Publication, International Journal of Educational Leadership Preparation, 5(2).Retrieved from the Connexions Web site: http://cnx.org/content/m34617/latest/ Used by permission.