Date of Award

11-1-1997

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. Lisa Kelly-Vance

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between a child’s perception of interparental conflict and a child’s level of self-esteem and social skills. Furthermore, gender and grade differences were analyzed to determine how they play a role in this relationship between interparental conflict and a child’s level of self-esteem and social skills. Self-report questionnaires were administered to 127 5th grade (elementary school) students and 137 6th grade (junior high school) students. Results indicated that a child’s self-report of interparental conflict was significantly and negatively related to the child’s self-report of self-esteem and social skills, even when controlling for the intercorrelations between self-esteemand social skills. Although grade and gender were not found to mediate the relationship between interparental conflict and childhood adjustment, grade and gender effects were found for social skills usage. Girls reported higher levels of social skills than boys, and 5th grade students reported higher levels of social skills than did 6th grade students. Differences among the three subscales of the CPIC were also noted. Although all three subscales were found to significantly account for self-esteem differences, only reports of self-blame and conflict properties accounted for social skills differences. Implications of the results are discussed.

Comments

An Ed.S. Project Presented to the Department of Psychology and the Faculty of the Graduate College University of Nebraska In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Specialist in Education University of Nebraska at Omaha. Copyright Christie Lynn Poe November, 1997

Share

COinS