Presentation Title

Improving the Likelihood of Effective Nutritional Intake among Residents of Long-term Care Facilities

Advisor Information

Priscilla Quinn

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 12:00 PM

Abstract

A concern in some Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities is that the nutritional needs of the residents are not being met and there is a significant risk factor for malnutrition and increased mortality. Many LTC residents do not fully partake in the dining experience due normative (e.g., to a lack of ability to taste and smell their food) and non-normative age changes (e.g., olfactory changes caused by aging, age-related diseases and medications) as well as the environment in which the food is being served (e.g., social factors). The purpose of this study was to identify interventions designed to promote healthy eating among residents in Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities. Specific areas of concern were: eating and normal aging, the social aspect of eating and the environment of the dining experience. Possible interventions are discussed such as consideration of food preferences, flavor enhancers, the number of people the residents eat with, time of day and where they eat. Although food enhancements appear to be the most effective intervention, it is clear that any intervention will include multiple factors.

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COinS
 
Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 12:00 PM

Improving the Likelihood of Effective Nutritional Intake among Residents of Long-term Care Facilities

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

A concern in some Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities is that the nutritional needs of the residents are not being met and there is a significant risk factor for malnutrition and increased mortality. Many LTC residents do not fully partake in the dining experience due normative (e.g., to a lack of ability to taste and smell their food) and non-normative age changes (e.g., olfactory changes caused by aging, age-related diseases and medications) as well as the environment in which the food is being served (e.g., social factors). The purpose of this study was to identify interventions designed to promote healthy eating among residents in Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities. Specific areas of concern were: eating and normal aging, the social aspect of eating and the environment of the dining experience. Possible interventions are discussed such as consideration of food preferences, flavor enhancers, the number of people the residents eat with, time of day and where they eat. Although food enhancements appear to be the most effective intervention, it is clear that any intervention will include multiple factors.