Presentation Title

Effects of urbanization on the species richness and abundance of native grassland birds

Advisor Information

L. LaReesa Wolfenbarger

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Omaha Room

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 3:30 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 3:45 PM

Abstract

Native Grassland bird populations have declined and continue to decline, mostly due to habitat loss as a result of urbanization and agriculture. The quality and productivity of the remaining, highly fragmented patches are threatened by further urbanization. In this study, I determined the effects of urbanization on the species richness and abundance of native grassland birds by surveying grassland fragments representing an urban to rural gradient around Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska and Council Bluffs, Iowa during the 2011 and 2012 breeding seasons. I used point count and line-transect distance sampling methods to determine the abundance and species richness of native birds. To account for effects of possible differences in management, the density and structure of vegetation were also measured at each site, along with area and edge-to-interior ratio. I determined the degree of surrounding urbanization for each site by using aerial imagery to quantify the land cover of random points in ArcGIS. I hypothesized that the species richness, and abundance of native grassland birds would decrease as urbanization surrounding a site increased.

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Mar 8th, 3:30 PM Mar 8th, 3:45 PM

Effects of urbanization on the species richness and abundance of native grassland birds

Milo Bail Student Center Omaha Room

Native Grassland bird populations have declined and continue to decline, mostly due to habitat loss as a result of urbanization and agriculture. The quality and productivity of the remaining, highly fragmented patches are threatened by further urbanization. In this study, I determined the effects of urbanization on the species richness and abundance of native grassland birds by surveying grassland fragments representing an urban to rural gradient around Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska and Council Bluffs, Iowa during the 2011 and 2012 breeding seasons. I used point count and line-transect distance sampling methods to determine the abundance and species richness of native birds. To account for effects of possible differences in management, the density and structure of vegetation were also measured at each site, along with area and edge-to-interior ratio. I determined the degree of surrounding urbanization for each site by using aerial imagery to quantify the land cover of random points in ArcGIS. I hypothesized that the species richness, and abundance of native grassland birds would decrease as urbanization surrounding a site increased.