Presentation Title

Empathetic Responding to those with Celiac Disease as a Function of Trait Empathy and Situational Factors

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Council Room

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 11:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 11:15 AM

Abstract

This literature review investigates the relationship between trait empathy and empathetic response, along with an examination of situations that elicit higher or lower levels of empathetic response. Research found that while increased levels of trait empathy might lead to more automatic empathetic response (Rameson, Morelli, & Lieberman, 2011), individual differences in empathetic response are largely dependent upon age, gender, emotional appeals, positive or negative situation framing, and degree of information provided (Bagozzi & Moore, 1994; Decety, Echols, & Correll, 2009; Sze, Gyurak, Goodkind, & Levenson, 2012; Taute, Huhmann, & Thakur, 2010). These data were collected predominantly from undergraduate students or others of the same age group, making this research primarily applicable to those between ages 18 and 30. Following this comprehensive review is a proposed research agenda for investigating the interaction of trait empathy and degree of information richness on empathetic response to people with celiac disease, a genetically linked autoimmune disorder (Celiac Sprue Association, 2013), which will utilize a sample of undergraduate students aged 19 and older.

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Mar 8th, 11:00 AM Mar 8th, 11:15 AM

Empathetic Responding to those with Celiac Disease as a Function of Trait Empathy and Situational Factors

Milo Bail Student Center Council Room

This literature review investigates the relationship between trait empathy and empathetic response, along with an examination of situations that elicit higher or lower levels of empathetic response. Research found that while increased levels of trait empathy might lead to more automatic empathetic response (Rameson, Morelli, & Lieberman, 2011), individual differences in empathetic response are largely dependent upon age, gender, emotional appeals, positive or negative situation framing, and degree of information provided (Bagozzi & Moore, 1994; Decety, Echols, & Correll, 2009; Sze, Gyurak, Goodkind, & Levenson, 2012; Taute, Huhmann, & Thakur, 2010). These data were collected predominantly from undergraduate students or others of the same age group, making this research primarily applicable to those between ages 18 and 30. Following this comprehensive review is a proposed research agenda for investigating the interaction of trait empathy and degree of information richness on empathetic response to people with celiac disease, a genetically linked autoimmune disorder (Celiac Sprue Association, 2013), which will utilize a sample of undergraduate students aged 19 and older.