Presentation Title

Phytoremediation: Fish life saver?

Advisor Information

Alan Kolok

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 4:00 PM

Abstract

The primary objective of this research project was to determine if direct competition occurred between an aquatic plant (Elodea canadensis), and a fish the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for a water -borne chemical, 17β-trenbolone (17b-Tb). If this were so, phytoremediation (the uptake of chemicals by plants) could remove contaminants within environmental systems in an advantageous and cost effective manner. In the current study, phytoremediation was used to mitigate the concentration of a steroid, 17bTb a compound known to cause reductions in the hepatic gene expression of vitellogenin in female fish. 17b-Tb was made available to the fish by means of spiked sediment at a concentration of 0.05μg/L. Unlike previous experiments, female fathead minnows in this study did not experience reductions in vitellogenin expression. Time integrating sampling of water determined that the 17b-Tb in the system was converted into trendione, a metabolite that does not appear to be bioavailable to the fish. Phytoremediation may not be necessary for compounds, such as 17b-Tb that quickly degrade into less toxic metabolites.

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Mar 8th, 1:00 PM Mar 8th, 4:00 PM

Phytoremediation: Fish life saver?

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

The primary objective of this research project was to determine if direct competition occurred between an aquatic plant (Elodea canadensis), and a fish the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for a water -borne chemical, 17β-trenbolone (17b-Tb). If this were so, phytoremediation (the uptake of chemicals by plants) could remove contaminants within environmental systems in an advantageous and cost effective manner. In the current study, phytoremediation was used to mitigate the concentration of a steroid, 17bTb a compound known to cause reductions in the hepatic gene expression of vitellogenin in female fish. 17b-Tb was made available to the fish by means of spiked sediment at a concentration of 0.05μg/L. Unlike previous experiments, female fathead minnows in this study did not experience reductions in vitellogenin expression. Time integrating sampling of water determined that the 17b-Tb in the system was converted into trendione, a metabolite that does not appear to be bioavailable to the fish. Phytoremediation may not be necessary for compounds, such as 17b-Tb that quickly degrade into less toxic metabolites.