Presentation Title

Coping Skills as a Moderator of Work-School Conflict on the Effects of Sleep Duration, Mood State, and General Well-Being

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Council Room

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:15 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 1:30 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this project is to explore the consequences of work-school conflict (WSC) among college students. Specifically, this study, will examine whether coping skills attenuate the negative effects of WSC on sleep duration, mood state, and general well-being. Markel and Frone (1998) proposed the concept of WSC, defining it as “the extent to which work interferes with an adolescent’s ability to meet school-related demands and responsibilities” (p.278). Their research indicated that most young adults typically attend school full-time and work part-time. The negative effects of WSC are considerable (Buboltz, Brown, & Sopher, 2001; Womble, 2003). Research by Buboltz, et al., has shown high levels of workload and school demands negatively influence student mood as they are unable to fulfill their obligations in both work and school domains. Furthermore, their study revealed that negative mood has a detrimental effect on sleep duration, which in turn, decreases their overall well-being. Research by Womble (2003) demonstrated that students who worked more hours and took a heavy course load reported a lower GPA at the end of the semester compared to students with fewer demands at school and work. Due to the deleterious effects of WSC on student psychological, physical, and academic outcomes, the study of coping skills is very important. This study seeks to determine the effect of coping skills on students’ sleep duration, their tendency to experience positive or negative moods and their general well-being with a specific focus on students experiencing high WSC.

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Mar 8th, 1:15 PM Mar 8th, 1:30 PM

Coping Skills as a Moderator of Work-School Conflict on the Effects of Sleep Duration, Mood State, and General Well-Being

Milo Bail Student Center Council Room

The purpose of this project is to explore the consequences of work-school conflict (WSC) among college students. Specifically, this study, will examine whether coping skills attenuate the negative effects of WSC on sleep duration, mood state, and general well-being. Markel and Frone (1998) proposed the concept of WSC, defining it as “the extent to which work interferes with an adolescent’s ability to meet school-related demands and responsibilities” (p.278). Their research indicated that most young adults typically attend school full-time and work part-time. The negative effects of WSC are considerable (Buboltz, Brown, & Sopher, 2001; Womble, 2003). Research by Buboltz, et al., has shown high levels of workload and school demands negatively influence student mood as they are unable to fulfill their obligations in both work and school domains. Furthermore, their study revealed that negative mood has a detrimental effect on sleep duration, which in turn, decreases their overall well-being. Research by Womble (2003) demonstrated that students who worked more hours and took a heavy course load reported a lower GPA at the end of the semester compared to students with fewer demands at school and work. Due to the deleterious effects of WSC on student psychological, physical, and academic outcomes, the study of coping skills is very important. This study seeks to determine the effect of coping skills on students’ sleep duration, their tendency to experience positive or negative moods and their general well-being with a specific focus on students experiencing high WSC.