Presentation Title

Development of a Family Affective Commitment Scale

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 12:00 PM

Abstract

The three components of organizational commitment are normative (moral obligation to stay with the organization), continuance (based on needs the organization fulfills), and affective commitment (emotional attachment to and internalization of the goals of the organization). Affective commitment has shown to be the most indicative of employee retention, increased organizational citizenship behaviors and other positive work outcomes (He, 2008; Meyer, Stanley, Herscovitch, & Totoplnystsy, 2002). Organizational attitudes such as commitment are not the only forces that influence an employee’s behavior; family factors also have an effect. Because organizational affective commitment has such important implications for work outcomes, we expect that attitudes toward the family would also affect work outcomes. As with organizational commitment, it is likely that there are multiple types of family commitment with distinct indicators, yet there is an absence of this type of research. Thus, we propose a new scale measuring family affective commitment (FAC). Paralleling Meyer and Allen’s (1991) definition of organizational affective commitment, FAC is defined as the emotional attachment to, internalization of goals and values of, and identification and involvement with the family unit. We developed a scale for FAC and administered it to 123 college students via an online survey system, along with other scales measuring related work attitudes and outcomes. Participants were required to be employed. This study will report the psychometric results including the factor structure and internal consistency reliabilities of FAC, as well as the relationship of FAC with the other constructs.

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Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 12:00 PM

Development of a Family Affective Commitment Scale

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

The three components of organizational commitment are normative (moral obligation to stay with the organization), continuance (based on needs the organization fulfills), and affective commitment (emotional attachment to and internalization of the goals of the organization). Affective commitment has shown to be the most indicative of employee retention, increased organizational citizenship behaviors and other positive work outcomes (He, 2008; Meyer, Stanley, Herscovitch, & Totoplnystsy, 2002). Organizational attitudes such as commitment are not the only forces that influence an employee’s behavior; family factors also have an effect. Because organizational affective commitment has such important implications for work outcomes, we expect that attitudes toward the family would also affect work outcomes. As with organizational commitment, it is likely that there are multiple types of family commitment with distinct indicators, yet there is an absence of this type of research. Thus, we propose a new scale measuring family affective commitment (FAC). Paralleling Meyer and Allen’s (1991) definition of organizational affective commitment, FAC is defined as the emotional attachment to, internalization of goals and values of, and identification and involvement with the family unit. We developed a scale for FAC and administered it to 123 college students via an online survey system, along with other scales measuring related work attitudes and outcomes. Participants were required to be employed. This study will report the psychometric results including the factor structure and internal consistency reliabilities of FAC, as well as the relationship of FAC with the other constructs.