Presentation Title

Reviewing Resilience as a Possible Moderator of Work-School Conflict on Job Satisfaction, Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, and General Well-Being

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Gallery Room

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:45 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 2:00 PM

Abstract

Work-school conflict (WSC) and its associated negative effects is a prevalent problem among our nation’s college student population (Butler, 2007; Steinberg, Fegley, & Dornbusch, 1993). WSC is defined as “the extent to which work interferes with an adolescent's ability to meet school-related demands and responsibilities,” (Markel & Frone, 1998, p.278). Daytime sleepiness, job satisfaction, and general wellbeing are important to study because these factors exert both indirect and direct effects on college students trying to balance a job while attending school. According to the American Council on Education, 70%-80% of undergraduate students elect to work part-time or full time while attending school full-time. General trends in research show negative outcomes associated with working 20 or more hours per week, including increased binge drinking, decreased sleep, and reduced academic performance (Miller, 2008; Gilbert, 2010). Research evidence for the relationship between resilience and academic success is mixed (Elizondo-Omana, 2007; Hartley, 2011), with some studies showing a positive influence and others not showing any appreciable effect. However, one study showed that students scoring high in resilience are less affected by daily ‘hassles’ and ‘struggles’ compared to students scoring low in resilience (Lai & Mak, 2009). The specific focus of my proposed oral presentation is to review and integrate the relevant research literature and theory as a basis for proposing resilience as a moderator of WSC on job satisfaction, general well-being, and daytime sleepiness. 70%-80% of undergraduate students elect to work part-time or full time while attending school full-time. General trends in research show negative outcomes associated with working 20 or more hours per week, including increased binge drinking, decreased sleep, and reduced academic performance (Miller, 2008; Gilbert, 2010). Research evidence for the relationship between resilience and academic success is mixed (Elizondo-Omana, 2007; Hartley, 2011), with some studies showing a positive influence and others not showing any appreciable effect. However, one study showed that students scoring high in resilience are less affected by daily ‘hassles’ and ‘struggles’ compared to students scoring low in resilience (Lai & Mak, 2009). The specific focus of my proposed oral presentation is to review and integrate the relevant research literature and theory as a basis for proposing resilience as a moderator of WSC on job satisfaction, general well-being, and daytime sleepiness.

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Mar 8th, 1:45 PM Mar 8th, 2:00 PM

Reviewing Resilience as a Possible Moderator of Work-School Conflict on Job Satisfaction, Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, and General Well-Being

Milo Bail Student Center Gallery Room

Work-school conflict (WSC) and its associated negative effects is a prevalent problem among our nation’s college student population (Butler, 2007; Steinberg, Fegley, & Dornbusch, 1993). WSC is defined as “the extent to which work interferes with an adolescent's ability to meet school-related demands and responsibilities,” (Markel & Frone, 1998, p.278). Daytime sleepiness, job satisfaction, and general wellbeing are important to study because these factors exert both indirect and direct effects on college students trying to balance a job while attending school. According to the American Council on Education, 70%-80% of undergraduate students elect to work part-time or full time while attending school full-time. General trends in research show negative outcomes associated with working 20 or more hours per week, including increased binge drinking, decreased sleep, and reduced academic performance (Miller, 2008; Gilbert, 2010). Research evidence for the relationship between resilience and academic success is mixed (Elizondo-Omana, 2007; Hartley, 2011), with some studies showing a positive influence and others not showing any appreciable effect. However, one study showed that students scoring high in resilience are less affected by daily ‘hassles’ and ‘struggles’ compared to students scoring low in resilience (Lai & Mak, 2009). The specific focus of my proposed oral presentation is to review and integrate the relevant research literature and theory as a basis for proposing resilience as a moderator of WSC on job satisfaction, general well-being, and daytime sleepiness. 70%-80% of undergraduate students elect to work part-time or full time while attending school full-time. General trends in research show negative outcomes associated with working 20 or more hours per week, including increased binge drinking, decreased sleep, and reduced academic performance (Miller, 2008; Gilbert, 2010). Research evidence for the relationship between resilience and academic success is mixed (Elizondo-Omana, 2007; Hartley, 2011), with some studies showing a positive influence and others not showing any appreciable effect. However, one study showed that students scoring high in resilience are less affected by daily ‘hassles’ and ‘struggles’ compared to students scoring low in resilience (Lai & Mak, 2009). The specific focus of my proposed oral presentation is to review and integrate the relevant research literature and theory as a basis for proposing resilience as a moderator of WSC on job satisfaction, general well-being, and daytime sleepiness.