Presentation Title

Phonological profiles of 2-year-olds with expressive-only and expressive and receptive language delay

Advisor Information

Shari Deveney

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 4:00 PM

Abstract

An estimated 10 to 15% of 2-year-old children gain new words more slowly and begin combining words into phrases later than their typically developing peers. This early language delay is associated with negative effects on later reading and social skill development. Although phonological development has been studied in late talking toddlers identified with expressive-only language delay, little is known about the phonological inventories of children identified with expressive and receptive language delays. Previous studies has been show that late talkers have a smaller vocabulary than their typically developing peers, but there is little research distinguishing the difference in phonological development between children identified as expressive-only language delay and children identified as expressive and receptive language delayed. It is important to understand the nuances between the two late talker subgroups for appropriate identification and early intervention services. Therefore, it is important to investigate the differences in the phonetic repertoires of expressive-only language delayed and expressive and receptive language delayed. In the present study, 15-minute language samples of nine late-talking children, ages 24- to 33-months old, interacting with a parent or caregiver in the child’s home were evaluated for their phonetic content. It is hypothesized that children with an expressiveonly delay will have larger phonetic inventories and a higher percentage of correct consonant productions than their peers with receptive and expressive delays. This study has clinical implications for speech-language pathologists because it will help provide a clearer understanding of expected clinical differences among late talking toddlers.

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Mar 8th, 1:00 PM Mar 8th, 4:00 PM

Phonological profiles of 2-year-olds with expressive-only and expressive and receptive language delay

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

An estimated 10 to 15% of 2-year-old children gain new words more slowly and begin combining words into phrases later than their typically developing peers. This early language delay is associated with negative effects on later reading and social skill development. Although phonological development has been studied in late talking toddlers identified with expressive-only language delay, little is known about the phonological inventories of children identified with expressive and receptive language delays. Previous studies has been show that late talkers have a smaller vocabulary than their typically developing peers, but there is little research distinguishing the difference in phonological development between children identified as expressive-only language delay and children identified as expressive and receptive language delayed. It is important to understand the nuances between the two late talker subgroups for appropriate identification and early intervention services. Therefore, it is important to investigate the differences in the phonetic repertoires of expressive-only language delayed and expressive and receptive language delayed. In the present study, 15-minute language samples of nine late-talking children, ages 24- to 33-months old, interacting with a parent or caregiver in the child’s home were evaluated for their phonetic content. It is hypothesized that children with an expressiveonly delay will have larger phonetic inventories and a higher percentage of correct consonant productions than their peers with receptive and expressive delays. This study has clinical implications for speech-language pathologists because it will help provide a clearer understanding of expected clinical differences among late talking toddlers.