Presentation Title

Toxicity and Efficacy of KG1 in clearing Toxoplasma gondii infection

Advisor Information

Paul Davis

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Council Room

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:30 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 9:45 AM

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that is capable of infecting any mammal, including humans. Approximately one third of the world’s population is chronically infected, of which, most people are unaware of the parasite’s presence. T. gondii infection results in two stages, an acute stage known as the tachyzoite and a chronic stage known as the bradyzoite. The immune systems of healthy individuals are able to recognize the tachyzoites and begin to clear them. However, the parasite is able to migrate to brain and muscle tissue where it converts to the bradyzoite stage by forming cysts. These cysts cannot be detected by the immune system, resulting in lifelong infection with a small chance of ever showing symptoms. There are very few drugs that are effective against the acute stage, and there are no known drugs that are able to cure the chronic infection. Efforts are currently underway to discover new drugs that are effective in treating both acute and chronic stages of the parasite. Our lab is currently testing new drugs for their ability to clear T. gondii. In this study, compound SJ000018645 (also known as KG1) was analyzed to determine its toxicity against human cells and its ability to kill the T. gondii. Initial results show that KG1 is effective against tachyzoites at a concentration that is low enough as to not kill human host cells. Due to the promising results, the next step is to investigate the effectiveness of KG1 against the chronic infection.

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Mar 8th, 9:30 AM Mar 8th, 9:45 AM

Toxicity and Efficacy of KG1 in clearing Toxoplasma gondii infection

Milo Bail Student Center Council Room

Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that is capable of infecting any mammal, including humans. Approximately one third of the world’s population is chronically infected, of which, most people are unaware of the parasite’s presence. T. gondii infection results in two stages, an acute stage known as the tachyzoite and a chronic stage known as the bradyzoite. The immune systems of healthy individuals are able to recognize the tachyzoites and begin to clear them. However, the parasite is able to migrate to brain and muscle tissue where it converts to the bradyzoite stage by forming cysts. These cysts cannot be detected by the immune system, resulting in lifelong infection with a small chance of ever showing symptoms. There are very few drugs that are effective against the acute stage, and there are no known drugs that are able to cure the chronic infection. Efforts are currently underway to discover new drugs that are effective in treating both acute and chronic stages of the parasite. Our lab is currently testing new drugs for their ability to clear T. gondii. In this study, compound SJ000018645 (also known as KG1) was analyzed to determine its toxicity against human cells and its ability to kill the T. gondii. Initial results show that KG1 is effective against tachyzoites at a concentration that is low enough as to not kill human host cells. Due to the promising results, the next step is to investigate the effectiveness of KG1 against the chronic infection.