Presentation Title

Effects of implementing problem-based learning activities in an undergraduate setting

Advisor Information

Christine Cutucache

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 12:00 PM

Abstract

A problem-based learning (PBL) activity is a student-focused method of learning that enhances student collaboration and communication to solve a real-life problem. Interestingly, few PBLs have been employed at the undergraduate level, particularly in biology. Therefore, our objective was to discern how PBLs influence knowledgebase, critical thinking skills, student communication, and information retention. We reviewed primary literature from the last decade pertaining to PBL activities in the classroom (n=28). The majority of these articles focused on medical school (n=10), polytechnic schools (n=8), and dental schools (n=4). Only 6 of the 28 articles were written about PBLs at the undergraduate level. Students were assessed in a number of ways, including: self-study, presentation, quiz, examination, survey, peer feedback, assignments, journal writing, or worksheets. In most articles, a facilitator was available to closely monitor a small group (n=24). In summary, the most effective method of PBL is a small group led by a sociable tutor where all group members meet and discuss study material. Additionally, we conclude that the incorporation of PBLs in the undergraduate level is a significant benefit to students in the program as well as to their potential in future studies.

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Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 12:00 PM

Effects of implementing problem-based learning activities in an undergraduate setting

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

A problem-based learning (PBL) activity is a student-focused method of learning that enhances student collaboration and communication to solve a real-life problem. Interestingly, few PBLs have been employed at the undergraduate level, particularly in biology. Therefore, our objective was to discern how PBLs influence knowledgebase, critical thinking skills, student communication, and information retention. We reviewed primary literature from the last decade pertaining to PBL activities in the classroom (n=28). The majority of these articles focused on medical school (n=10), polytechnic schools (n=8), and dental schools (n=4). Only 6 of the 28 articles were written about PBLs at the undergraduate level. Students were assessed in a number of ways, including: self-study, presentation, quiz, examination, survey, peer feedback, assignments, journal writing, or worksheets. In most articles, a facilitator was available to closely monitor a small group (n=24). In summary, the most effective method of PBL is a small group led by a sociable tutor where all group members meet and discuss study material. Additionally, we conclude that the incorporation of PBLs in the undergraduate level is a significant benefit to students in the program as well as to their potential in future studies.