Presentation Title

Impact of dual-tasking on lower joint dynamics during stair ascension

Advisor Information

Mukul Mukherjee

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 4:00 PM

Abstract

Stair-climbing is a daily activity, often done while performing other tasks such as talking or carrying a laundry basket. The objective of the current study is to evaluate joint dynamics during stair-climbing while dual-tasking to identify changes that take place. We hypothesized that a significant difference in joint moments and powers would occur as a result of dual-tasking during stair ascension. Ten healthy young adults (23.9±2.8 years; 175.98±0.06 cm; 71.3±8.6 kg) performed ten trials for each of four conditions (control, cognitive, motor, and combined). Kinematics and kinetics data were collected as participants ascended a four-step staircase. The first and third steps had built-in force platforms, which allowed us to collect force data from two consecutive ipsilateral steps. A 2x4 (2 steps x 4 conditions) repeated measures ANOVA was applied to compare speed, joint moments and powers of the lower extremities. Bonferroni pairwise comparisons were used to determine significant differences between conditions. For measures that showed significant differences, a repeated measures ANCOVA was performed with speed as the covariate. Condition main effect results indicate that performing a cognitively challenging task has a greater influence than a motor task on how people climb stairs. Step main effect results show that at the first step, participants seem to produce lesser moments at the ankle while producing greater moments at the hip and at knee. Step-Condition interaction results indicate that while ascending the second step, participants increased the power absorbed at the ankle only in the control and motor conditions.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 8th, 1:00 PM Mar 8th, 4:00 PM

Impact of dual-tasking on lower joint dynamics during stair ascension

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Stair-climbing is a daily activity, often done while performing other tasks such as talking or carrying a laundry basket. The objective of the current study is to evaluate joint dynamics during stair-climbing while dual-tasking to identify changes that take place. We hypothesized that a significant difference in joint moments and powers would occur as a result of dual-tasking during stair ascension. Ten healthy young adults (23.9±2.8 years; 175.98±0.06 cm; 71.3±8.6 kg) performed ten trials for each of four conditions (control, cognitive, motor, and combined). Kinematics and kinetics data were collected as participants ascended a four-step staircase. The first and third steps had built-in force platforms, which allowed us to collect force data from two consecutive ipsilateral steps. A 2x4 (2 steps x 4 conditions) repeated measures ANOVA was applied to compare speed, joint moments and powers of the lower extremities. Bonferroni pairwise comparisons were used to determine significant differences between conditions. For measures that showed significant differences, a repeated measures ANCOVA was performed with speed as the covariate. Condition main effect results indicate that performing a cognitively challenging task has a greater influence than a motor task on how people climb stairs. Step main effect results show that at the first step, participants seem to produce lesser moments at the ankle while producing greater moments at the hip and at knee. Step-Condition interaction results indicate that while ascending the second step, participants increased the power absorbed at the ankle only in the control and motor conditions.