Presentation Title

Patients with peripheral arterial disease exhibit greater toe clearance than healthy controls

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 12:00 PM

Abstract

Minimum toe clearance (MTC) during the swing phase is considered a critical gait event when assessing fall risk. Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have been shown to experience 73% more falls than healthy controls. It is possible that PAD patients have abnormal toe clearance, contributing to an increased risk of falls. The purpose of this study was to investigate MTC in healthy individuals and PAD patients. We hypothesize that PAD patients would exhibit a reduced MTC due to lower limb impairment. Ten PAD patients and ten healthy controls were studied. Mean MTC and standard deviations were both analyzed. Contrary to our hypothesis, PAD patients had a significantly greater MTC on average. Gait limitations seen in PAD, such as reduced power during stance or shortened stride length may cause PAD patients to compensate and lift their foot higher than a healthy individual. While not significant, the MTC variability was greater in PAD patients. So while PAD patients on average exhibit a greater MTC, certain strides throughout the gait cycle could possibly be lower and put them at risk of tripping. These results could indicate that average MTC in the swing phase may not be a major cause of falling in PAD patients. However further research needs to be performed to make this determination, including examining the variability of MTC over time.

Comments

Winner of Meritorious Graduate Poster Presentation

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Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 12:00 PM

Patients with peripheral arterial disease exhibit greater toe clearance than healthy controls

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Minimum toe clearance (MTC) during the swing phase is considered a critical gait event when assessing fall risk. Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have been shown to experience 73% more falls than healthy controls. It is possible that PAD patients have abnormal toe clearance, contributing to an increased risk of falls. The purpose of this study was to investigate MTC in healthy individuals and PAD patients. We hypothesize that PAD patients would exhibit a reduced MTC due to lower limb impairment. Ten PAD patients and ten healthy controls were studied. Mean MTC and standard deviations were both analyzed. Contrary to our hypothesis, PAD patients had a significantly greater MTC on average. Gait limitations seen in PAD, such as reduced power during stance or shortened stride length may cause PAD patients to compensate and lift their foot higher than a healthy individual. While not significant, the MTC variability was greater in PAD patients. So while PAD patients on average exhibit a greater MTC, certain strides throughout the gait cycle could possibly be lower and put them at risk of tripping. These results could indicate that average MTC in the swing phase may not be a major cause of falling in PAD patients. However further research needs to be performed to make this determination, including examining the variability of MTC over time.