Presentation Title

School-life conflict and its relationship to student well-being

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 4:00 PM

Abstract

The goal of this study is to develop and test a new measure of school-life conflict (SLC) as well as to create a model to better understand the personal characteristics associated with school-life conflict. Schoollife conflict is the extent to which life demands, such as work and family, interfere with students’ ability to function at school. We are interested in the extent to which neuroticism and affective organizational commitment influence the experience of school-life conflict, as well as the extent to which school-life conflict and neuroticism influence students’ evaluations of their physical and mental health. Specifically, we expect that the relationship between affective organizational commitment (i.e., emotional attachment to the organization) and school-life conflict will be moderated by neuroticism, such that when neuroticism is high, high affective organizational commitment will lead to high school-life conflict, whereas low affective organizational commitment will lead to low school-life conflict. When neuroticism is low, school-life conflict will be low regardless of degree of affective organizational commitment. Moreover, we predict that the relationship between school-life conflict and health will be moderated by neuroticism, such that when neuroticism is high, high school-life conflict will lead to lower health, whereas low school-life conflict will lead to higher health. When neuroticism is low, health will be higher regardless of level of school -life conflict. Implications for methods of reducing SWC and enhancing student coping skills and health will be discussed.

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Mar 8th, 1:00 PM Mar 8th, 4:00 PM

School-life conflict and its relationship to student well-being

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

The goal of this study is to develop and test a new measure of school-life conflict (SLC) as well as to create a model to better understand the personal characteristics associated with school-life conflict. Schoollife conflict is the extent to which life demands, such as work and family, interfere with students’ ability to function at school. We are interested in the extent to which neuroticism and affective organizational commitment influence the experience of school-life conflict, as well as the extent to which school-life conflict and neuroticism influence students’ evaluations of their physical and mental health. Specifically, we expect that the relationship between affective organizational commitment (i.e., emotional attachment to the organization) and school-life conflict will be moderated by neuroticism, such that when neuroticism is high, high affective organizational commitment will lead to high school-life conflict, whereas low affective organizational commitment will lead to low school-life conflict. When neuroticism is low, school-life conflict will be low regardless of degree of affective organizational commitment. Moreover, we predict that the relationship between school-life conflict and health will be moderated by neuroticism, such that when neuroticism is high, high school-life conflict will lead to lower health, whereas low school-life conflict will lead to higher health. When neuroticism is low, health will be higher regardless of level of school -life conflict. Implications for methods of reducing SWC and enhancing student coping skills and health will be discussed.