Presentation Title

The Influence of Task and Impulsivity on Malevolent Creativity

Advisor Information

Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 12:00 PM

Abstract

Although creativity can be defined in a variety of ways, most people often think of creativity as an act that leads to a positive outcome of some kind. However, there is a darker side to creativity called malevolent creativity. To be malevolently creative is to be intentionally harmful in original ways, and little empirical research has been conducted to study it. The main focus of this study was to examine malevolent creativity and its relationship with different problem-solving tasks (aggressive vs. pro-social) and premeditation (i.e., the degree to which someone acts impulsively and considers the consequences of his or her actions). We hypothesized that people would be more malevolently creative if they (a) responded to an aggressive task and (b) were lower in premeditation. We also hypothesized that these two factors would interact to influence malevolent creativity. Our hypotheses were supported. With the interaction in particular, we found that responding to a pro-social task inhibited the degree to which premeditation influenced malevolent creativity. But when people responded to an aggressive task, premeditation strongly influenced malevolent creativity. These results suggest that people who act impulsively and do not consider the consequences of their actions, as well as people who respond to aggressive problems are more likely to be malevolently creative. Furthermore, we have found support for the notion that the relationship between malevolent creativity and certain traits likely depends on the type of problem that must be resolved.

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Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 12:00 PM

The Influence of Task and Impulsivity on Malevolent Creativity

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Although creativity can be defined in a variety of ways, most people often think of creativity as an act that leads to a positive outcome of some kind. However, there is a darker side to creativity called malevolent creativity. To be malevolently creative is to be intentionally harmful in original ways, and little empirical research has been conducted to study it. The main focus of this study was to examine malevolent creativity and its relationship with different problem-solving tasks (aggressive vs. pro-social) and premeditation (i.e., the degree to which someone acts impulsively and considers the consequences of his or her actions). We hypothesized that people would be more malevolently creative if they (a) responded to an aggressive task and (b) were lower in premeditation. We also hypothesized that these two factors would interact to influence malevolent creativity. Our hypotheses were supported. With the interaction in particular, we found that responding to a pro-social task inhibited the degree to which premeditation influenced malevolent creativity. But when people responded to an aggressive task, premeditation strongly influenced malevolent creativity. These results suggest that people who act impulsively and do not consider the consequences of their actions, as well as people who respond to aggressive problems are more likely to be malevolently creative. Furthermore, we have found support for the notion that the relationship between malevolent creativity and certain traits likely depends on the type of problem that must be resolved.