Presentation Title

Team Creativity: An Exploratory Analysis of Creative Problem Solving in Teams

Advisor Information

Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 12:00 PM

Abstract

In order to maintain a competitive edge in an ever-evolving market place, organizations rely on teams to solve problems in an effective and creative manner. Problem solving research at the individual level has indicated that a more structured problem solving process facilitates creativity. However, this finding has not been replicated in teams. Building on this research, the effect of process and outcome satisfaction during a team problem solving task is examined. Contrary to creative problem solving at the individual level, teams tended to be more creative in a less structured problem solving task. Specifically, teams who experienced high satisfaction with the team process tended to be more creative when a less structured problem solving process was used than teams who experienced less satisfaction with the team process. Implications of this contradictory finding are discussed and recommendations for future team research are presented.

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Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 12:00 PM

Team Creativity: An Exploratory Analysis of Creative Problem Solving in Teams

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

In order to maintain a competitive edge in an ever-evolving market place, organizations rely on teams to solve problems in an effective and creative manner. Problem solving research at the individual level has indicated that a more structured problem solving process facilitates creativity. However, this finding has not been replicated in teams. Building on this research, the effect of process and outcome satisfaction during a team problem solving task is examined. Contrary to creative problem solving at the individual level, teams tended to be more creative in a less structured problem solving task. Specifically, teams who experienced high satisfaction with the team process tended to be more creative when a less structured problem solving process was used than teams who experienced less satisfaction with the team process. Implications of this contradictory finding are discussed and recommendations for future team research are presented.