Presentation Title

Spoken novel word productions across 2-year-olds with varying language skill proficiencies

Advisor Information

Shari DeVeney

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-3-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 4:00 PM

Abstract

Early language development delays can have long-lasting adverse effects for later social, language, and literacy skill development. Children who by 24 months of age demonstrate expressive language delays through using fewer than 50 words and not producing two-word combinations are identified as late talkers. The central goal of this study was to investigate verbal productions of novel words paired with unfamiliar objects and representational picture symbols. There is limited research regarding the word-learning behaviors of late-talking toddlers. The study utilized a single subject design and analyzed the verbal production characteristics of nine two-year olds (three late talkers with expressive-only language delays, three with expressive and receptive language delays, and three typically developing peers). Participants were between the ages of 24-31 months old. Using an existing data set, we conducted a post-hoc analysis with previously recorded videotaped sessions. We reanalyzed data formerly coded as “spontaneous verbal productions” to identify specific spoken production performance patterns in word learning across participant language skill proficiencies. Specifically, verbal productions were separated into unprompted, prompted, and direct imitation of adult models. We are investigating the differences between typically developing toddlers and their language-delayed peers in targeted spoken word productions. It is predicted that typically developing two-year-olds will likely produce a greater number of unprompted spoken productions than their late-talking peers. Expressive-only participants will likely demonstrate more unprompted spoken productions sooner than their expressive and receptive language delayed peers. The results of this study will help inform clinical practice for speech-language pathologists working in early childhood settings.

Comments

Winner of Outstanding Undergraduate Poster Presentation

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Mar 8th, 1:00 PM Mar 8th, 4:00 PM

Spoken novel word productions across 2-year-olds with varying language skill proficiencies

Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom

Early language development delays can have long-lasting adverse effects for later social, language, and literacy skill development. Children who by 24 months of age demonstrate expressive language delays through using fewer than 50 words and not producing two-word combinations are identified as late talkers. The central goal of this study was to investigate verbal productions of novel words paired with unfamiliar objects and representational picture symbols. There is limited research regarding the word-learning behaviors of late-talking toddlers. The study utilized a single subject design and analyzed the verbal production characteristics of nine two-year olds (three late talkers with expressive-only language delays, three with expressive and receptive language delays, and three typically developing peers). Participants were between the ages of 24-31 months old. Using an existing data set, we conducted a post-hoc analysis with previously recorded videotaped sessions. We reanalyzed data formerly coded as “spontaneous verbal productions” to identify specific spoken production performance patterns in word learning across participant language skill proficiencies. Specifically, verbal productions were separated into unprompted, prompted, and direct imitation of adult models. We are investigating the differences between typically developing toddlers and their language-delayed peers in targeted spoken word productions. It is predicted that typically developing two-year-olds will likely produce a greater number of unprompted spoken productions than their late-talking peers. Expressive-only participants will likely demonstrate more unprompted spoken productions sooner than their expressive and receptive language delayed peers. The results of this study will help inform clinical practice for speech-language pathologists working in early childhood settings.