Presentation Title

'Gettin' Down Wit Da Talkin' Thang' Perception of Communicative Competence When Using Urban Vernacular in a Job Interview

Advisor Information

Joy Chao

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Dodge Room B

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 2:00 PM

End Date

8-3-2013 2:15 PM

Abstract

Today's millennials, those individuals born between 1982 and 2002, are competing in distressed job market. Recent research shows employers believe millennials lack competency in communication. Employers' concern is supported by research drawn from a 2009 survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admission Council of corporate recruiters from more than 2000 companies. In this study, 89% of the recruiters ranked communication skills as the number one hiring characteristic. Without competent communication skills, millennials risk unemployment and lack of opportunity for future promotion. Moreover, scholarly research posits that the influences of urbanization, pop culture, text messaging and electronic social networking has adjusted verbal and nonverbal norms. Labeled urban vernacular, this verbal and nonverbal "shorthand" presents a problem for recruiters and employers, as well. The purpose of this thesis is to understand the relationship between using urban language in a job interview and the perceived communicative competence of the applicant. Moreover, this study will investigate the influences age, gender and ethnicity on these perceptions. Using survey data gathered from participants who observe eight different millennial speakers, some of whom use Standard American English (SAE) and others who use urban vernacular, will provide insight into whether cultural norms have become more flexible, making a less formal style of communication acceptable in a recruiting situation.

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COinS
 
Mar 8th, 2:00 PM Mar 8th, 2:15 PM

'Gettin' Down Wit Da Talkin' Thang' Perception of Communicative Competence When Using Urban Vernacular in a Job Interview

Milo Bail Student Center Dodge Room B

Today's millennials, those individuals born between 1982 and 2002, are competing in distressed job market. Recent research shows employers believe millennials lack competency in communication. Employers' concern is supported by research drawn from a 2009 survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admission Council of corporate recruiters from more than 2000 companies. In this study, 89% of the recruiters ranked communication skills as the number one hiring characteristic. Without competent communication skills, millennials risk unemployment and lack of opportunity for future promotion. Moreover, scholarly research posits that the influences of urbanization, pop culture, text messaging and electronic social networking has adjusted verbal and nonverbal norms. Labeled urban vernacular, this verbal and nonverbal "shorthand" presents a problem for recruiters and employers, as well. The purpose of this thesis is to understand the relationship between using urban language in a job interview and the perceived communicative competence of the applicant. Moreover, this study will investigate the influences age, gender and ethnicity on these perceptions. Using survey data gathered from participants who observe eight different millennial speakers, some of whom use Standard American English (SAE) and others who use urban vernacular, will provide insight into whether cultural norms have become more flexible, making a less formal style of communication acceptable in a recruiting situation.