Presentation Title

Effects of Toxoplasma gondii growth in host cells that overexpress the gene CYP17

Advisor Information

Paul Davis

Location

Milo Bail Student Center Gallery Room

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-3-2013 11:30 AM

End Date

8-3-2013 11:45 AM

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a parasitic protozoa that can infect all mammal including humans. Humans can ingest Toxoplasma by eating undercooked meat or by exposure to cat feces. T. gondii can cause birth defects, encephalitis, and more recently has been shown to cause behavior alteration in the chronic stage of infection. Recently a cell base screening determined that when the gene CYP17 was overexpressed, T. gondii grew at an increased rate. CYP17 codes for an enzyme involved in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. To determine the mechanism of increased parasite growth, host cells have been created to express an inserted copy of CYP17. The created cell lines will be tested against wildtype human cells in three separate experiments. These experiments will test the rate of parasite invasion into host cells, intracellular growth and egress. The outcomes of these experiments will determine at what stage of growth CYP17 overexpression most affects.

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Mar 8th, 11:30 AM Mar 8th, 11:45 AM

Effects of Toxoplasma gondii growth in host cells that overexpress the gene CYP17

Milo Bail Student Center Gallery Room

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a parasitic protozoa that can infect all mammal including humans. Humans can ingest Toxoplasma by eating undercooked meat or by exposure to cat feces. T. gondii can cause birth defects, encephalitis, and more recently has been shown to cause behavior alteration in the chronic stage of infection. Recently a cell base screening determined that when the gene CYP17 was overexpressed, T. gondii grew at an increased rate. CYP17 codes for an enzyme involved in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. To determine the mechanism of increased parasite growth, host cells have been created to express an inserted copy of CYP17. The created cell lines will be tested against wildtype human cells in three separate experiments. These experiments will test the rate of parasite invasion into host cells, intracellular growth and egress. The outcomes of these experiments will determine at what stage of growth CYP17 overexpression most affects.