Presentation Title

Localization ADAM proteins expressed by the mmd gene in neuronal cells of Drosophila

Advisor Information

Bruce Chase

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain) proteins are membrane-anchored and secreted glycoproteins able to disrupt integrin-mediated cell-cell interactions. About half of them have active metalloprotease domains that can process and cut-off extracellular portions of transmembrane proteins releasing growth factors, cytokines, and modifying receptors, thereby altering inter- and intracellular signaling processes. While some ADAM proteins are known to play critical roles in key developmental processes (e.g., fertilization, nervous system formation, muscle formation) and cancer, the physiological relevance of other proteins is not known. One approach to understanding the function of such ADAMs is to undertake genetic analyses in model organisms such as Drosophila (fruit flies). Analysis of genomic DNA sequence has identified seven genes for ADAM proteins. The Drosophila mind-meld gene, an ADAM-protein-coding gene with an unknown function, encodes a set of ADAM proteins similar to human ADAM 23.The mmd gene is expressed in the nervous system like the ADAM 23. The transcripts of mmd undergo extensive alternative mRNA splicing to produce at least four different protein isoforms. The proteins were visualized using indirect immunofluorescence staining to understand what role the isoforms play in the developing and adult nervous system. Confocal microscopy was used to detect and analyze the pattern of staining.

Comments

Winner of Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

Localization ADAM proteins expressed by the mmd gene in neuronal cells of Drosophila

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain) proteins are membrane-anchored and secreted glycoproteins able to disrupt integrin-mediated cell-cell interactions. About half of them have active metalloprotease domains that can process and cut-off extracellular portions of transmembrane proteins releasing growth factors, cytokines, and modifying receptors, thereby altering inter- and intracellular signaling processes. While some ADAM proteins are known to play critical roles in key developmental processes (e.g., fertilization, nervous system formation, muscle formation) and cancer, the physiological relevance of other proteins is not known. One approach to understanding the function of such ADAMs is to undertake genetic analyses in model organisms such as Drosophila (fruit flies). Analysis of genomic DNA sequence has identified seven genes for ADAM proteins. The Drosophila mind-meld gene, an ADAM-protein-coding gene with an unknown function, encodes a set of ADAM proteins similar to human ADAM 23.The mmd gene is expressed in the nervous system like the ADAM 23. The transcripts of mmd undergo extensive alternative mRNA splicing to produce at least four different protein isoforms. The proteins were visualized using indirect immunofluorescence staining to understand what role the isoforms play in the developing and adult nervous system. Confocal microscopy was used to detect and analyze the pattern of staining.