Presentation Title

Mental Health and Violence in the Family: An Integrated Theory

Advisor Information

Pete Simi

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 107

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 1:15 PM

Abstract

Little is known about the unique victimization experience among the parents and siblings of a violent and mentally ill family member. Although victimization research provides substantial insight, most of the familial violence research is in the scope of child abuse and neglect, interpersonal violence, and spousal abuse. Also, the modern theoretical explanations of victimization (e.g., cultural trappings and cultural norms of violence, victim precipitation, and routine activities) do not address the victimization experience within the family, specifically for the siblings and parents of a mentally ill family member. Likewise, the typologies and classification systems used in victimization theory do not address the unique needs of these family members. Drawing upon Tittle's (1995) theory integration techniques and family systems theory, the present study will formulate a theory of family victimization in which the central premise is that the victimization experience is different for victims when the offender is a mentally ill family member. The research is guided by the following questions: What type of social-psychological strategies do individuals develop to cope with a violent and mentally ill relative? More specifically, how do parents and siblings process the experience of victimization?

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Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 1:15 PM

Mental Health and Violence in the Family: An Integrated Theory

UNO Criss Library, Room 107

Little is known about the unique victimization experience among the parents and siblings of a violent and mentally ill family member. Although victimization research provides substantial insight, most of the familial violence research is in the scope of child abuse and neglect, interpersonal violence, and spousal abuse. Also, the modern theoretical explanations of victimization (e.g., cultural trappings and cultural norms of violence, victim precipitation, and routine activities) do not address the victimization experience within the family, specifically for the siblings and parents of a mentally ill family member. Likewise, the typologies and classification systems used in victimization theory do not address the unique needs of these family members. Drawing upon Tittle's (1995) theory integration techniques and family systems theory, the present study will formulate a theory of family victimization in which the central premise is that the victimization experience is different for victims when the offender is a mentally ill family member. The research is guided by the following questions: What type of social-psychological strategies do individuals develop to cope with a violent and mentally ill relative? More specifically, how do parents and siblings process the experience of victimization?