Presentation Title

Land Use and Crime: A Partial Replication of Stucky and Ottensmann's 2009 Study

Advisor Information

Amy Anderson

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 1:45 PM

Abstract

This study used elements from both routine activity theory and social disorganization theory to partially replicate and expand Stucky and Ottensmann’s (2009) analysis of the effects of land use on violent crime. First, I examined the relationship between land use and violent crime to determine whether land use types that encourage the convergence of motivated offenders and potential victims, in the absence of capable guardians, contributed to block group violent crime rates. Next, I expanded the work of Stucky and Ottensmann (2009) by examining whether similar relationships existed between land use and property crime. Finally, I examined whether any relationships between land use and crime were conditioned by the amount of social disadvantage in the block group. I collected AY2000 data from the Omaha Police Department, the Douglas County Assessor, and the United States Census, and aggregated it as necessary to create the block group level measures used in the analyses. Preliminary findings from multivariate analyses and spatial mapping of the residuals suggested that the effects of the type of land use on violent and property crime varied across Omaha, Nebraska, depending on the social characteristics of the area.

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Mar 7th, 1:30 PM Mar 7th, 1:45 PM

Land Use and Crime: A Partial Replication of Stucky and Ottensmann's 2009 Study

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

This study used elements from both routine activity theory and social disorganization theory to partially replicate and expand Stucky and Ottensmann’s (2009) analysis of the effects of land use on violent crime. First, I examined the relationship between land use and violent crime to determine whether land use types that encourage the convergence of motivated offenders and potential victims, in the absence of capable guardians, contributed to block group violent crime rates. Next, I expanded the work of Stucky and Ottensmann (2009) by examining whether similar relationships existed between land use and property crime. Finally, I examined whether any relationships between land use and crime were conditioned by the amount of social disadvantage in the block group. I collected AY2000 data from the Omaha Police Department, the Douglas County Assessor, and the United States Census, and aggregated it as necessary to create the block group level measures used in the analyses. Preliminary findings from multivariate analyses and spatial mapping of the residuals suggested that the effects of the type of land use on violent and property crime varied across Omaha, Nebraska, depending on the social characteristics of the area.