Presentation Title

Implications of Self-Percieved Body Image on Sports Performance in Elite Female Volleyball Players

Advisor Information

Sofia Jawed-Wessel

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

There have been concerns about athletes in “image” sports such as gymnastics, ballet, and swimming. As the idealized female image gets leaner, and sports uniforms become more form fitting there is a need to explore the implications of body image and eating disorders in all female sports. Research has supported the idea that female adolescents’ participation in athletics before college has a positive influence on characteristics associated with a positive self-esteem (Richman, 2000). However, research also shows that rates of disordered eating are highest amongst elite level female athletes (Jorunn 2004, Blackmer 2011). The current project was a cross-sectional, online survey study of self-perceived body image and self-perceived sports performance. To be included in the study, participants had to be Division I, female, volleyball players. Data was collected three times throughout the sports season, once at the beginning of the season, mid-season, and post-season. Descriptive statistics were used to describe athletes’ demographics, body image and performance. Questionnaire items were also assessed for reliability and validity in this sample. Twenty-five surveys were completed from 14 athletes. Participant’s age ranged from 18 to 21 (X=19.80; Md=20; SD= 0.76) and the majority (100%) identified as White. In the sample collected it appeared that the outside, right side, and middle hitters were more critical of their appearance when they felt that their performance was poor. The defensive specialists, liberos, and setter groups appeared the most confident and consistent in their views of both their skills and appearance.

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Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Implications of Self-Percieved Body Image on Sports Performance in Elite Female Volleyball Players

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

There have been concerns about athletes in “image” sports such as gymnastics, ballet, and swimming. As the idealized female image gets leaner, and sports uniforms become more form fitting there is a need to explore the implications of body image and eating disorders in all female sports. Research has supported the idea that female adolescents’ participation in athletics before college has a positive influence on characteristics associated with a positive self-esteem (Richman, 2000). However, research also shows that rates of disordered eating are highest amongst elite level female athletes (Jorunn 2004, Blackmer 2011). The current project was a cross-sectional, online survey study of self-perceived body image and self-perceived sports performance. To be included in the study, participants had to be Division I, female, volleyball players. Data was collected three times throughout the sports season, once at the beginning of the season, mid-season, and post-season. Descriptive statistics were used to describe athletes’ demographics, body image and performance. Questionnaire items were also assessed for reliability and validity in this sample. Twenty-five surveys were completed from 14 athletes. Participant’s age ranged from 18 to 21 (X=19.80; Md=20; SD= 0.76) and the majority (100%) identified as White. In the sample collected it appeared that the outside, right side, and middle hitters were more critical of their appearance when they felt that their performance was poor. The defensive specialists, liberos, and setter groups appeared the most confident and consistent in their views of both their skills and appearance.