Presentation Title

Investigating Counterintuitive Neuroendocrine Responses to Predatory Threats in Marmoset Monkeys

Advisor Information

Jeffrey French

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:30 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 9:45 AM

Abstract

Recent studies with marmosets have demonstrated that anti-predator mobbing behavior and associated alarm vocalizations, called “tsiks,” may act as a mechanism of self-modulating the neuroendocrine stress response to the presence of predators. These previous studies found the counterintuitive result that the stress hormone known as cortisol decreases when marmosets respond to predators. A separate study found that similar decreases in physiological stress levels occurred in marmosets that produced tsik vocalizations when they were merely allowed access to outdoor living spaces. There is a gap in the literature investigating the breadth of the physiological effect of tsik vocalizations using adequate controls. The study funded by FUSE aimed to investigate the potential extent of the neuroendocrine modulation of the stress response as a function of tsik vocalizations produced across a spectrum of controlled stimuli. Each stimulus was presented on a pedestal. The stimuli included: a rearing model snake, a football, the pedestal by itself, and a removed sanitary shoe cover. Behavior in response to the stimuli was recorded and saliva and urine were non-invasively collected to assess hormone levels across a 5 hour period. These samples were then processed using enzyme immunoassay techniques. Our results showed a significant correlation between tsik vocalizations in response to the predatory stimulus compared to controls. The endocrine results are still being analyzed for statistical significance and further work may be required.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:30 AM Mar 7th, 9:45 AM

Investigating Counterintuitive Neuroendocrine Responses to Predatory Threats in Marmoset Monkeys

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Recent studies with marmosets have demonstrated that anti-predator mobbing behavior and associated alarm vocalizations, called “tsiks,” may act as a mechanism of self-modulating the neuroendocrine stress response to the presence of predators. These previous studies found the counterintuitive result that the stress hormone known as cortisol decreases when marmosets respond to predators. A separate study found that similar decreases in physiological stress levels occurred in marmosets that produced tsik vocalizations when they were merely allowed access to outdoor living spaces. There is a gap in the literature investigating the breadth of the physiological effect of tsik vocalizations using adequate controls. The study funded by FUSE aimed to investigate the potential extent of the neuroendocrine modulation of the stress response as a function of tsik vocalizations produced across a spectrum of controlled stimuli. Each stimulus was presented on a pedestal. The stimuli included: a rearing model snake, a football, the pedestal by itself, and a removed sanitary shoe cover. Behavior in response to the stimuli was recorded and saliva and urine were non-invasively collected to assess hormone levels across a 5 hour period. These samples were then processed using enzyme immunoassay techniques. Our results showed a significant correlation between tsik vocalizations in response to the predatory stimulus compared to controls. The endocrine results are still being analyzed for statistical significance and further work may be required.