Presentation Title

Body Mass Index, Body Image, Sexual Function and Sexual Behavior Among Young Women

Advisor Information

Sofia Jawed-Wessel

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 10:15 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Research demonstrates that women with low body image perceptions are likely to also experience less healthy sexual functioning. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between body size, body image, sexual behaviors and sexual well-being. A cross sectional study was conducted with 210 women aged 19-24 years in the Midwest. Measures included multiple scales to assess exercise patterns, body image perceptions, sexual behaviors, and female sexual function. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess whether BMI or body image was a better predictor of various sexual behaviors. Independent sample t-tests were used to examine differences in body image perceptions, sexual functions, and sexual behaviors based on socio-demographic characteristics. A significant negative correlation was found between sexual function and body image selfconsciousness during sexual activity (-.179, P<.010). Body dissatisfaction was positively correlated with body selfconsciousness (.678, P<.0001) and body avoidance (.604, P<.0001). Body avoidance was negatively correlated with sexual satisfaction (-.178, p<.010). As BMI increased, body avoidance (.366, P<.0001), body selfconsciousness (.227, P<.001), and body dissatisfaction (.412, P<.001) also increased. Although women with higher BMI scores were more likely to experience greater body image dissatisfaction, avoidance, and self-consciousness, they were not more likely to experience difficulties with sexual functioning. Sexual function is related to body image self-consciousness during physical intimacy. These findings suggest women are more likely experience sexual function difficulties if they feel self-conscious about their bodies during sexual activity and not necessarily because they are, or are considered, overweight.

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Mar 7th, 10:15 AM Mar 7th, 10:30 AM

Body Mass Index, Body Image, Sexual Function and Sexual Behavior Among Young Women

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Research demonstrates that women with low body image perceptions are likely to also experience less healthy sexual functioning. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between body size, body image, sexual behaviors and sexual well-being. A cross sectional study was conducted with 210 women aged 19-24 years in the Midwest. Measures included multiple scales to assess exercise patterns, body image perceptions, sexual behaviors, and female sexual function. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess whether BMI or body image was a better predictor of various sexual behaviors. Independent sample t-tests were used to examine differences in body image perceptions, sexual functions, and sexual behaviors based on socio-demographic characteristics. A significant negative correlation was found between sexual function and body image selfconsciousness during sexual activity (-.179, P<.010). Body dissatisfaction was positively correlated with body selfconsciousness (.678, P<.0001) and body avoidance (.604, P<.0001). Body avoidance was negatively correlated with sexual satisfaction (-.178, p<.010). As BMI increased, body avoidance (.366, P<.0001), body selfconsciousness (.227, P<.001), and body dissatisfaction (.412, P<.001) also increased. Although women with higher BMI scores were more likely to experience greater body image dissatisfaction, avoidance, and self-consciousness, they were not more likely to experience difficulties with sexual functioning. Sexual function is related to body image self-consciousness during physical intimacy. These findings suggest women are more likely experience sexual function difficulties if they feel self-conscious about their bodies during sexual activity and not necessarily because they are, or are considered, overweight.