Presentation Title

Seasonal activity of migratory tree bats (Lasiurus and Lasionycteris) in southeastern Nebraska using acoustic detectors

Advisor Information

Jeremy White

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 2:15 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

Wind energy, while a valuable and growing source of renewable energy, has resulted in a significant impact on migratory bat populations throughout North America. Three of these species, the eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis), the hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans), migrate through southeastern Nebraska, an area where there is potential for wind farm development. In this study, an acoustic detector was used to record echolocation calls as bats flew through a forest clearing in Otoe County from April to December 2013. Bat calls were identified by automated software programs and nightly counts of identified calls were tallied for each species. Based on our acoustic data, the three migratory species had different patterns of seasonal activity in southeastern Nebraska. Eastern red bats had the longest period of activity in the area; they were recorded consistently from early April until early December. Silver-haired bats were recorded from early April until early October, but most calls of this species were recorded in spring and few were detected in summer or fall. Hoary bats were consistently detected beginning in mid-May and their number of calls peaked in July, but dropped drastically by the beginning of August. Although more data needs to be collected over a broader area, this study contributes to our understanding of migratory patterns of tree bats in eastern Nebraska, which is an essential step in developing strategies to minimize bat fatalities at proposed wind energy facilities in the region.

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 2:15 PM Mar 7th, 2:30 PM

Seasonal activity of migratory tree bats (Lasiurus and Lasionycteris) in southeastern Nebraska using acoustic detectors

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Wind energy, while a valuable and growing source of renewable energy, has resulted in a significant impact on migratory bat populations throughout North America. Three of these species, the eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis), the hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans), migrate through southeastern Nebraska, an area where there is potential for wind farm development. In this study, an acoustic detector was used to record echolocation calls as bats flew through a forest clearing in Otoe County from April to December 2013. Bat calls were identified by automated software programs and nightly counts of identified calls were tallied for each species. Based on our acoustic data, the three migratory species had different patterns of seasonal activity in southeastern Nebraska. Eastern red bats had the longest period of activity in the area; they were recorded consistently from early April until early December. Silver-haired bats were recorded from early April until early October, but most calls of this species were recorded in spring and few were detected in summer or fall. Hoary bats were consistently detected beginning in mid-May and their number of calls peaked in July, but dropped drastically by the beginning of August. Although more data needs to be collected over a broader area, this study contributes to our understanding of migratory patterns of tree bats in eastern Nebraska, which is an essential step in developing strategies to minimize bat fatalities at proposed wind energy facilities in the region.