Presentation Title

Effects of Visual Perception of Self-Motion on Gait in People with Diabetes

Advisor Information

Ka-Chun Siu

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

The reliance on visual perception is crucial in diabetes mellitus (DM) population who bear higher probability of suffering from somatosensory deficits that attenuates their sensory input and causes falls. The visual perception of self-motion during locomotion has been shown being adopted to maintain dynamic stability in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of self-motion that was perceived by people with DM and age-matched healthy control on gait alteration during locomotion. We recruited three chronic DM and three age-matched healthy controls to walk on a treadmill with their self-selective pace under two different conditions: with and without a virtual corridor that moves toward the subjects. The 3D spatiotemporal gait characteristics were measured using NDI motion capture system. We compared the group effect and the effect of visual perception on gait characteristics (step length, step width, step time) and the variations using two-way ANOVA with repeated measure. As result, DM showed significantly decreased step length compared to healthy; in addition, DM decreased step width more than those in control group under the virtual condition. We conclude that visual perception of self-motion plays a prominent role on gait adjustment/alteration in DM during treadmill walking. Virtual environment could be useful for DM to adopt their walking strategy which is safe to prevent from future incidence of falls.

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Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Effects of Visual Perception of Self-Motion on Gait in People with Diabetes

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The reliance on visual perception is crucial in diabetes mellitus (DM) population who bear higher probability of suffering from somatosensory deficits that attenuates their sensory input and causes falls. The visual perception of self-motion during locomotion has been shown being adopted to maintain dynamic stability in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of self-motion that was perceived by people with DM and age-matched healthy control on gait alteration during locomotion. We recruited three chronic DM and three age-matched healthy controls to walk on a treadmill with their self-selective pace under two different conditions: with and without a virtual corridor that moves toward the subjects. The 3D spatiotemporal gait characteristics were measured using NDI motion capture system. We compared the group effect and the effect of visual perception on gait characteristics (step length, step width, step time) and the variations using two-way ANOVA with repeated measure. As result, DM showed significantly decreased step length compared to healthy; in addition, DM decreased step width more than those in control group under the virtual condition. We conclude that visual perception of self-motion plays a prominent role on gait adjustment/alteration in DM during treadmill walking. Virtual environment could be useful for DM to adopt their walking strategy which is safe to prevent from future incidence of falls.