Presentation Title

Modeling HIV Infection of Macrophages

Advisor Information

Tomas Helikar

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:30 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 9:45 AM

Abstract

The goal of this project was to create a large scale, dynamic, model of HIV infecting a macrophage cell using the Cell Collective. The Cell Collective is online software that allows the user to mine knowledge regarding cellular activity and simulate that activity under different conditions in silico. A previous network representing macrophages existed on the Cell Collective with which the model for HIV infection was combined. This not only produced the largest macrophage model in existence but it also allowed us to study the downstream effects of an HIV infection on the totality of the cell. The model was then verified using the Cell Collective’s real-time simulator which allowed the user to actively visualize and mutate the model. In addition the dynamic analysis was used to run thousands of different simulations under unique stimuli. The complete model can now be used to identify which proteins have the largest role in an HIV infection, either by means of a piece by piece knockout study or by new software being developed in our laboratory. This information could then be used to create new and innovative treatments.

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Mar 7th, 9:30 AM Mar 7th, 9:45 AM

Modeling HIV Infection of Macrophages

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

The goal of this project was to create a large scale, dynamic, model of HIV infecting a macrophage cell using the Cell Collective. The Cell Collective is online software that allows the user to mine knowledge regarding cellular activity and simulate that activity under different conditions in silico. A previous network representing macrophages existed on the Cell Collective with which the model for HIV infection was combined. This not only produced the largest macrophage model in existence but it also allowed us to study the downstream effects of an HIV infection on the totality of the cell. The model was then verified using the Cell Collective’s real-time simulator which allowed the user to actively visualize and mutate the model. In addition the dynamic analysis was used to run thousands of different simulations under unique stimuli. The complete model can now be used to identify which proteins have the largest role in an HIV infection, either by means of a piece by piece knockout study or by new software being developed in our laboratory. This information could then be used to create new and innovative treatments.