Presentation Title

Police Officers and School Settings: Examining the Influence of the School Environment on Officer Roles and Job Satisfaction

Advisor Information

Dr. Samantha Clinkinbeard

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 1:45 PM

Abstract

Despite growing numbers of school police personnel, little research has examined how school environments influence officers assigned to school resource officer (SRO) programs. This study explored officers’ perceptions of their roles and job satisfaction. Fifty-two SROs from a statewide Midwestern region were matched to 328 patrol officers at a Midwestern agency. Findings revealed, compared to patrol officers, SROs performed fewer order maintenance tasks, reported lower levels of role conflict, and were more satisfied along one dimension of job satisfaction. Results supported the link between role perceptions and job satisfaction, suggesting officers in a specialized position were protected from sources of role conflict, which poses implications for improving the job performance and wellbeing of officers.

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Mar 7th, 1:30 PM Mar 7th, 1:45 PM

Police Officers and School Settings: Examining the Influence of the School Environment on Officer Roles and Job Satisfaction

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Despite growing numbers of school police personnel, little research has examined how school environments influence officers assigned to school resource officer (SRO) programs. This study explored officers’ perceptions of their roles and job satisfaction. Fifty-two SROs from a statewide Midwestern region were matched to 328 patrol officers at a Midwestern agency. Findings revealed, compared to patrol officers, SROs performed fewer order maintenance tasks, reported lower levels of role conflict, and were more satisfied along one dimension of job satisfaction. Results supported the link between role perceptions and job satisfaction, suggesting officers in a specialized position were protected from sources of role conflict, which poses implications for improving the job performance and wellbeing of officers.