Presentation Title

Work-school-life conflict and college student success and well-being: a review of unanswered questions

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Student retention is a major problem faced by universities, and of course, the students themselves (Barefoot, 2004). A number of stressors are facing college students today. Many students work part-time or full-time jobs, take a full load of college courses, and take care of their families. On top of that they may lack academic preparedness and face difficult financial issues, all of which can lead them to drop out of college (Barefoot 2004; Daley, 2010). However, studies have shown that students who experience a high level of wellness are more likely to continue with their academic studies, earn a higher grade-point average, and produce better career outcomes (Botha, 2012; Hettler, 1980; Horton, 2009). In addition, Bakker’s (2007) Job-Demands Resources model predicts that stress and negative life outcomes will increase as the demands operating on a person increase; however, as number of resources available increase so will their ability to cope with these negative effects of demands on wellness. My poster will review the current research literature in this area and explain my current research hypothesis. The JD-R model was developed for employees in a work context; however, it has never been applied to students who face demands beyond those of just work. I will be adapting the JDR model to assess working, college student perceptions of their total life demands and total life resources on their wellness, intentions to quit school, and academic success.

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Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Work-school-life conflict and college student success and well-being: a review of unanswered questions

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Student retention is a major problem faced by universities, and of course, the students themselves (Barefoot, 2004). A number of stressors are facing college students today. Many students work part-time or full-time jobs, take a full load of college courses, and take care of their families. On top of that they may lack academic preparedness and face difficult financial issues, all of which can lead them to drop out of college (Barefoot 2004; Daley, 2010). However, studies have shown that students who experience a high level of wellness are more likely to continue with their academic studies, earn a higher grade-point average, and produce better career outcomes (Botha, 2012; Hettler, 1980; Horton, 2009). In addition, Bakker’s (2007) Job-Demands Resources model predicts that stress and negative life outcomes will increase as the demands operating on a person increase; however, as number of resources available increase so will their ability to cope with these negative effects of demands on wellness. My poster will review the current research literature in this area and explain my current research hypothesis. The JD-R model was developed for employees in a work context; however, it has never been applied to students who face demands beyond those of just work. I will be adapting the JDR model to assess working, college student perceptions of their total life demands and total life resources on their wellness, intentions to quit school, and academic success.