Presentation Title

Knowledge coordination crossing firm boundaries in Open Source Communities: An empirical study in open source

Advisor Information

Matthew Germonprez

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 10:15 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Open Source is viewed as a real option for organizational knowledge production risk reduction during research & development activities. However, the Open Source community environment can lead to moral hazards where some participants simply take a "free-ride" and consume resources without contributing back to the community. The risk management methodologies between open source community and participants are not always obvious, and current management practices do not clearly explain the engagement issues beyond individuals. My research proposes a management methodology to address the complexities when organizations engage an open source community, highlighting the knowledge transfer issues involved in such practices. Through an empirical study of open source projects, I investigate knowledge transfer practices in open source project engagement for different participants and understand how these practices are identified and systematically managed. I present the results from two open source projects, involving several organizations, representing three unique types of participation. The analysis explicates the roles that participants play in the engagement with open source communities, and how the roles stratify across different leadership patterns. The paper describes participants' practices used to engage to open source communities, which provides critical insight into understanding the complexities of knowledge transfer and the relationships between methods, process, and individual actions. In addition, the study of work practices in open source software development is also valuable to understand knowledge coordination in the context of large-scale, distributed projects between organizations that cross firm boundaries to explore and exploit knowledge in open communities.

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Mar 7th, 10:15 AM Mar 7th, 10:30 AM

Knowledge coordination crossing firm boundaries in Open Source Communities: An empirical study in open source

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Open Source is viewed as a real option for organizational knowledge production risk reduction during research & development activities. However, the Open Source community environment can lead to moral hazards where some participants simply take a "free-ride" and consume resources without contributing back to the community. The risk management methodologies between open source community and participants are not always obvious, and current management practices do not clearly explain the engagement issues beyond individuals. My research proposes a management methodology to address the complexities when organizations engage an open source community, highlighting the knowledge transfer issues involved in such practices. Through an empirical study of open source projects, I investigate knowledge transfer practices in open source project engagement for different participants and understand how these practices are identified and systematically managed. I present the results from two open source projects, involving several organizations, representing three unique types of participation. The analysis explicates the roles that participants play in the engagement with open source communities, and how the roles stratify across different leadership patterns. The paper describes participants' practices used to engage to open source communities, which provides critical insight into understanding the complexities of knowledge transfer and the relationships between methods, process, and individual actions. In addition, the study of work practices in open source software development is also valuable to understand knowledge coordination in the context of large-scale, distributed projects between organizations that cross firm boundaries to explore and exploit knowledge in open communities.