Presentation Title

Role Expansion and Role Conflict among Employed Arab Israeli Women

Advisor Information

Carey Ryan

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:45 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 2:00 PM

Abstract

Holding multiple roles is generally considered beneficial for psychological and physical health among women (and men) partly because of greater opportunities for success and meaning in life; however, multiple roles can also result in distress and dissatisfaction, particularly in contexts where a traditional gender-role ideology is strong. We examined perceptions of role expansion and role conflict among Arab women in Israel (N=287; M age = 39 years, SD=8.9)—a group whose entry into employment and professional careers has been relatively recent. Most participants (91%) were married and nearly three-quarters (74%) had from two to four children (89% had at least one child). Participants completed a questionnaire that included measures of the extent to which careers and motherhood facilitated or conflicted with their career, motherhood, and community roles; perceived stress; and general satisfaction. Results indicated that participants perceived greater role expansion than conflict—especially for career (vs. motherhood) roles. Further, career expansion was associated with greater satisfaction, whereas motherhood was generally associated with greater stress. These relationships held when the other types of role facilitation and conflict were controlled.

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Mar 7th, 1:45 PM Mar 7th, 2:00 PM

Role Expansion and Role Conflict among Employed Arab Israeli Women

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Holding multiple roles is generally considered beneficial for psychological and physical health among women (and men) partly because of greater opportunities for success and meaning in life; however, multiple roles can also result in distress and dissatisfaction, particularly in contexts where a traditional gender-role ideology is strong. We examined perceptions of role expansion and role conflict among Arab women in Israel (N=287; M age = 39 years, SD=8.9)—a group whose entry into employment and professional careers has been relatively recent. Most participants (91%) were married and nearly three-quarters (74%) had from two to four children (89% had at least one child). Participants completed a questionnaire that included measures of the extent to which careers and motherhood facilitated or conflicted with their career, motherhood, and community roles; perceived stress; and general satisfaction. Results indicated that participants perceived greater role expansion than conflict—especially for career (vs. motherhood) roles. Further, career expansion was associated with greater satisfaction, whereas motherhood was generally associated with greater stress. These relationships held when the other types of role facilitation and conflict were controlled.