Presentation Title

Two Drug-Like Compounds Show Limited Effectiveness in Treating Acute Toxoplasmosis in the Mouse Model

Advisor Information

Paul Davis

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-3-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 2:15 PM

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is a human parasite that can cause serious health problems, including death, in some individuals. There are currently no FDA approved drugs that are able to completely eliminate toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infections). Since there are no drugs available that can completely clear toxoplasmosis, it is important to identify compounds that may be able to serve as anti-Toxoplasma drugs. Additionally, many compounds that can eliminate toxoplasmosis are effective in treating malaria, a disease that kills more than one million people each year. Therefore, anti-Toxoplasma drug discovery studies have the potential to save the lives of those affected by malaria and toxoplasmosis by identifying new treatments for both diseases. Recently, a small group of drug-like compounds were identified as compounds that may be able to clear toxoplasmosis. Six of these compounds were confirmed microscopically as compounds that inhibit the growth of T. gondii in vitro by our group. These six compounds were then evaluated for toxicity and efficacy in clearing toxoplasmosis at the organismal level. Since Toxoplasma can infect mice as well as humans, mice were chosen as the animal model for evaluating the therapeutic value of these six compounds. Three compounds demonstrated extreme toxicity in mice. One compound tested showed promise in treating the infection, but results were inconclusive (p>0.05). Two compounds, however, were effective in eliminating adverse effects of T. gondii infections (p<0.05).

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Mar 7th, 2:00 PM Mar 7th, 2:15 PM

Two Drug-Like Compounds Show Limited Effectiveness in Treating Acute Toxoplasmosis in the Mouse Model

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Toxoplasma gondii is a human parasite that can cause serious health problems, including death, in some individuals. There are currently no FDA approved drugs that are able to completely eliminate toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infections). Since there are no drugs available that can completely clear toxoplasmosis, it is important to identify compounds that may be able to serve as anti-Toxoplasma drugs. Additionally, many compounds that can eliminate toxoplasmosis are effective in treating malaria, a disease that kills more than one million people each year. Therefore, anti-Toxoplasma drug discovery studies have the potential to save the lives of those affected by malaria and toxoplasmosis by identifying new treatments for both diseases. Recently, a small group of drug-like compounds were identified as compounds that may be able to clear toxoplasmosis. Six of these compounds were confirmed microscopically as compounds that inhibit the growth of T. gondii in vitro by our group. These six compounds were then evaluated for toxicity and efficacy in clearing toxoplasmosis at the organismal level. Since Toxoplasma can infect mice as well as humans, mice were chosen as the animal model for evaluating the therapeutic value of these six compounds. Three compounds demonstrated extreme toxicity in mice. One compound tested showed promise in treating the infection, but results were inconclusive (p>0.05). Two compounds, however, were effective in eliminating adverse effects of T. gondii infections (p<0.05).