Presentation Title

Reducing Off-Task Behaviors with Reinforcement-Based Procedures

Advisor Information

Lisa Kelly-Vance

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

This presentation describes a combination of reinforcement-based procedures that were used to decrease off-task behaviors in a first-grade male student, Gale (name has been changed). Off-task behaviors included verbal, motor and passive behaviors. First, a token economy was implemented with a Mystery Motivator component. Gale earned tokens and praise for on-task behaviors and after earning six tokens, he colored in one square on the Mystery Motivator board. If the square revealed a star, Gale picked a reward. While Gale’s off-task behaviors showed a decreasing trend, he did not receive a high schedule of reinforcement because of infrequent implementation. Next, Gale was taught to self-monitor his behaviors. Gale had an iPod and one ear bud through which he heard a beep at random intervals. Every time he heard the beep, he marked whether he was on task. Each day, Gale had a goal of how many “yeses” he had to earn for a reward. Gale’s off-task behaviors continued to decrease, but at the request of his teacher, the token board was implemented again and self-monitoring ceased. Gale’s behaviors decreased from baseline, during which he was off task 63% of the time. During the token board/ Mystery Motivator intervention, off-task behavior was reduced as low as 31%, with a session average of 44%. During the self-monitoring intervention, off-task behavior was as low as 14% with a session average of 20.35%.

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Reducing Off-Task Behaviors with Reinforcement-Based Procedures

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

This presentation describes a combination of reinforcement-based procedures that were used to decrease off-task behaviors in a first-grade male student, Gale (name has been changed). Off-task behaviors included verbal, motor and passive behaviors. First, a token economy was implemented with a Mystery Motivator component. Gale earned tokens and praise for on-task behaviors and after earning six tokens, he colored in one square on the Mystery Motivator board. If the square revealed a star, Gale picked a reward. While Gale’s off-task behaviors showed a decreasing trend, he did not receive a high schedule of reinforcement because of infrequent implementation. Next, Gale was taught to self-monitor his behaviors. Gale had an iPod and one ear bud through which he heard a beep at random intervals. Every time he heard the beep, he marked whether he was on task. Each day, Gale had a goal of how many “yeses” he had to earn for a reward. Gale’s off-task behaviors continued to decrease, but at the request of his teacher, the token board was implemented again and self-monitoring ceased. Gale’s behaviors decreased from baseline, during which he was off task 63% of the time. During the token board/ Mystery Motivator intervention, off-task behavior was reduced as low as 31%, with a session average of 44%. During the self-monitoring intervention, off-task behavior was as low as 14% with a session average of 20.35%.