Presentation Title

Protein expression in thermophilic and non-thermophilic synechococcus with induced stress

Advisor Information

Richard Lomneth

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

In recent decades, it became clear that many microorganisms live and reproduce in extreme environments. To understand how specific organisms survive these conditions it is important to understand how and what macromolecules, namely enzymes, enable organisms to withstand the said conditions. This study examined groel protein amounts in both, thermophilic synechococcus sp. Strain ja-2-3b’a(2-13) and non-thermophilic (marine) synechococcus sp. Strain pcc 7002. A subset of thermophilic cells exposed to 6% co2 over 172 hours showed a 1.6 fold increase in groel compared to a 2.4 fold increase observed from cells that received no added co2 exposure. When assessing groel levels independently of time and stresses, it was observed that the thermophilic species had 3.3 fold of groel compared to the marine species. A 1.6 fold of groel was also observed in marine species deprived of co2 relative to the marine cells at normal conditions; similar to the thermophilic species. This data supports the hypotheses that groel is up-regulated when synechococcus spp. Are deprived of co2 and also supports that thermophilic synechococcus have a substantially higher groel concentration; insisting that the thermophilic species rely on an abundance of groel, compared to the marine species.

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Protein expression in thermophilic and non-thermophilic synechococcus with induced stress

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

In recent decades, it became clear that many microorganisms live and reproduce in extreme environments. To understand how specific organisms survive these conditions it is important to understand how and what macromolecules, namely enzymes, enable organisms to withstand the said conditions. This study examined groel protein amounts in both, thermophilic synechococcus sp. Strain ja-2-3b’a(2-13) and non-thermophilic (marine) synechococcus sp. Strain pcc 7002. A subset of thermophilic cells exposed to 6% co2 over 172 hours showed a 1.6 fold increase in groel compared to a 2.4 fold increase observed from cells that received no added co2 exposure. When assessing groel levels independently of time and stresses, it was observed that the thermophilic species had 3.3 fold of groel compared to the marine species. A 1.6 fold of groel was also observed in marine species deprived of co2 relative to the marine cells at normal conditions; similar to the thermophilic species. This data supports the hypotheses that groel is up-regulated when synechococcus spp. Are deprived of co2 and also supports that thermophilic synechococcus have a substantially higher groel concentration; insisting that the thermophilic species rely on an abundance of groel, compared to the marine species.