Presentation Title

Promoting Prosocial Behavior Using Cooperative Video Games and Peer Models

Advisor Information

Lisa Kelly-Vance

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Prosocial skills can involve positive social interactions such as appropriately conversing with peers and adults. Studies have indicated that not only nonviolent video games but also a peer model may help increase prosocial behaviors. Because the amount of video game play is so high, video games can potentially be used as a great teaching tool. Four 1st grade students will take part in this study. Students will be placed into two groups with each group containing one student who is socially at risk, and one student who represents a typical, socially developing peer. Participant groups will receive approximately fifteen minutes of intervention time weekly in the form of gameplay sessions. All intervention sessions will be conducted in a room which will contain gameplay stations. All games selected for the Nintendo Wii will consistently place participant pairs on the same team within gameplay, encouraging cooperation to reach a mutual goal (as opposed to competition). Observational data will be collected once a week from participants during recess periods and during gameplay. By pairing those students who are believed to be socially “at-risk” with typically developing peers in prosocial, cooperative video gameplay sessions, this study pursues the advantages of video gameplay to increase prosocial skills. These advantages may include initiating and maintaining group play, sharing, and carrying on appropriate conversations with peers. Pairing nonviolent, cooperative video game play with peer modeling will increase prosocial behavior. Participants will learn how using video games can be used in a learning environment to promote prosocial skills.

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Promoting Prosocial Behavior Using Cooperative Video Games and Peer Models

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Prosocial skills can involve positive social interactions such as appropriately conversing with peers and adults. Studies have indicated that not only nonviolent video games but also a peer model may help increase prosocial behaviors. Because the amount of video game play is so high, video games can potentially be used as a great teaching tool. Four 1st grade students will take part in this study. Students will be placed into two groups with each group containing one student who is socially at risk, and one student who represents a typical, socially developing peer. Participant groups will receive approximately fifteen minutes of intervention time weekly in the form of gameplay sessions. All intervention sessions will be conducted in a room which will contain gameplay stations. All games selected for the Nintendo Wii will consistently place participant pairs on the same team within gameplay, encouraging cooperation to reach a mutual goal (as opposed to competition). Observational data will be collected once a week from participants during recess periods and during gameplay. By pairing those students who are believed to be socially “at-risk” with typically developing peers in prosocial, cooperative video gameplay sessions, this study pursues the advantages of video gameplay to increase prosocial skills. These advantages may include initiating and maintaining group play, sharing, and carrying on appropriate conversations with peers. Pairing nonviolent, cooperative video game play with peer modeling will increase prosocial behavior. Participants will learn how using video games can be used in a learning environment to promote prosocial skills.