Presentation Title

Influence of Distributive Justice on Volunteer Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit as a Function of the Importance of Outcomes

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine whether volunteers’ experiences of distributive justice influence their satisfaction and intentions to quit. Previous work has only examined the effects of distributive justice in employee samples, and has found that employees who perceive distributive injustice experience lower job satisfaction (Lind & Tyler, 1988). This issue is of greater importance in volunteer samples because there are no obligations, such as financial responsibilities, that prevent volunteers from quitting. When volunteers experience feelings of dissatisfaction in volunteer work, they are more likely to have a conscious intent to quit volunteering than those who feel satisfied (Vecina, Chacón, Sueiro, & Barrón, 2012). Further, when individuals have intentions to quit they are more likely to follow through with quitting than individuals who do not have such intentions (Azjen, 1991). Results indicated that satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between volunteers’ perceptions of distributive justice and their intention to quit. Additionally, consistent with Locke’s value theory (1969), the importance that volunteers place on the outcomes distributed in their volunteer organization moderated the relationship between distributive justice and satisfaction such that the relationship between distributive justice and satisfaction was stronger for volunteers who placed greater importance on outcomes. Exploring the role of distributive justice in improving volunteer satisfaction and retention is not only theoretically important but also offers practical solutions for nonprofit organizations dealing with issues of volunteer turnover.

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Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Influence of Distributive Justice on Volunteer Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit as a Function of the Importance of Outcomes

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The purpose of this study is to examine whether volunteers’ experiences of distributive justice influence their satisfaction and intentions to quit. Previous work has only examined the effects of distributive justice in employee samples, and has found that employees who perceive distributive injustice experience lower job satisfaction (Lind & Tyler, 1988). This issue is of greater importance in volunteer samples because there are no obligations, such as financial responsibilities, that prevent volunteers from quitting. When volunteers experience feelings of dissatisfaction in volunteer work, they are more likely to have a conscious intent to quit volunteering than those who feel satisfied (Vecina, Chacón, Sueiro, & Barrón, 2012). Further, when individuals have intentions to quit they are more likely to follow through with quitting than individuals who do not have such intentions (Azjen, 1991). Results indicated that satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between volunteers’ perceptions of distributive justice and their intention to quit. Additionally, consistent with Locke’s value theory (1969), the importance that volunteers place on the outcomes distributed in their volunteer organization moderated the relationship between distributive justice and satisfaction such that the relationship between distributive justice and satisfaction was stronger for volunteers who placed greater importance on outcomes. Exploring the role of distributive justice in improving volunteer satisfaction and retention is not only theoretically important but also offers practical solutions for nonprofit organizations dealing with issues of volunteer turnover.