Presentation Title

Cyber Dissidents: Harbingers of Change

Advisor Information

Jody Neathery-Castro

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

This piece of research is concerned with gauging the public’s cumulative shift in opinion in the wake of the two most notable instances of cyber whistle blowing. Within the research, I display the existence of two dichotomously positioned schools of thought. The first school of thought is a conglomeration of scholars who sympathize with the notion of cyber dissidence and thus, believe that the public should revere dissidents as protectors of civil liberties and the like. The second school of thought is reserved for those who believe that the cyber dissidence is harmful to national security and that dissidents should be regarded as deviants or renegades. The model that is employed for this research shows that with each act of whistle blowing, public support for government agencies wanes while support for the dissidents themselves increases. I utilized public opinion polling data from Pew, Huffington Post and Gallup studies to bolster my assertions.

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Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Cyber Dissidents: Harbingers of Change

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

This piece of research is concerned with gauging the public’s cumulative shift in opinion in the wake of the two most notable instances of cyber whistle blowing. Within the research, I display the existence of two dichotomously positioned schools of thought. The first school of thought is a conglomeration of scholars who sympathize with the notion of cyber dissidence and thus, believe that the public should revere dissidents as protectors of civil liberties and the like. The second school of thought is reserved for those who believe that the cyber dissidence is harmful to national security and that dissidents should be regarded as deviants or renegades. The model that is employed for this research shows that with each act of whistle blowing, public support for government agencies wanes while support for the dissidents themselves increases. I utilized public opinion polling data from Pew, Huffington Post and Gallup studies to bolster my assertions.