Presentation Title

A Play Intervention for Native Spanish Speaking Preschool Students

Advisor Information

Lisa Kelly-Vance

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Play is considered an important part of child development as it aids in problem solving, social skills, language development and skills associated with school success. Play interventions have been developed to aid those students who may developmentally be lacking play skills. One population that has not been specifically studied is children who speak Spanish as a native language who may face difficulties because many skills are taught to them using a language they may not understand. This study examined the effects of a play intervention done in English on native Spanish speaking children’s play skills. The participants included three preschool students one male (3 years 11 months) and two females (5 years 2 months and 5 years 4 months), who speak Spanish as a native language. The intervention occurred twice a week for four weeks and followed a plan, play and review method which incorporated reading a story, teaching new play skills, giving praise and encouragement and reviewing what they had learned. All three children increased in the amount of time they spent in pretend play and the percentage of pretend play acts the completed according to observational data from the PIECES. Two children increased the highest level of play achieved while the third remained at the same level. I will be presenting my research study and its results in a poster format.

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

A Play Intervention for Native Spanish Speaking Preschool Students

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Play is considered an important part of child development as it aids in problem solving, social skills, language development and skills associated with school success. Play interventions have been developed to aid those students who may developmentally be lacking play skills. One population that has not been specifically studied is children who speak Spanish as a native language who may face difficulties because many skills are taught to them using a language they may not understand. This study examined the effects of a play intervention done in English on native Spanish speaking children’s play skills. The participants included three preschool students one male (3 years 11 months) and two females (5 years 2 months and 5 years 4 months), who speak Spanish as a native language. The intervention occurred twice a week for four weeks and followed a plan, play and review method which incorporated reading a story, teaching new play skills, giving praise and encouragement and reviewing what they had learned. All three children increased in the amount of time they spent in pretend play and the percentage of pretend play acts the completed according to observational data from the PIECES. Two children increased the highest level of play achieved while the third remained at the same level. I will be presenting my research study and its results in a poster format.