Presentation Title

The Effects of Constant vs. Variable Workload Cycling on Performance and Perception

Advisor Information

Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether constant workload (CL) or variable (VL) workload cycling stimulates different physiological and psychological responses. METHODS: Recreationally-trained male cyclists (n=8, age 32 ± 5.3 y, mass 75.7 ± 10.9 kg, body fat 13.4 ± 5.6%, VO2 peak 4.6 ± 0.6 L · min-1) completed two experimental trials. The VL trial alternated between 3 min at 45% Wmax and 3 min at 85% Wmax until completion of the 63 min trial. The CL trial cycled at a constant 65% Wmax for 63 min. Following each trial, participants completed a self-paced 10 km time trial. Blood lactate was measured at the beginning, 6, 30, and 60 min, and conclusion of the trial. RESULTS: There was no difference between VL and CL performance trials (16.97 ± 2.07 min, 16.81 ± 1.47 min, respectively p = 0.62), VO2 (3.62 ± 0.71, 3.68 ± 0.66 L · min-1, respectively, p = 0.43), HR (160 ± 12, 161 ± 12 bpm, respectively, p = 0.64), blood lactate (10.4 ± 4.2, 9.2 ± 5.1 mmol · L-1, respectively, p = 0.52), RPE (18 ± 2, 18 ± 2, respectively, p = 0.22), Feeling Scale (9 ± 2, 9 ± 1, respectively, p = 0.63), or Attentional Focus (2 ± 2, 2 ± 2, respectively, p = 0.32). CONCLUSION: These data indicate that when overall work is held constant, despite different intensity profiles, there is no impact on acute measures of performance, physiology, or perception.

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Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

The Effects of Constant vs. Variable Workload Cycling on Performance and Perception

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

PURPOSE: To determine whether constant workload (CL) or variable (VL) workload cycling stimulates different physiological and psychological responses. METHODS: Recreationally-trained male cyclists (n=8, age 32 ± 5.3 y, mass 75.7 ± 10.9 kg, body fat 13.4 ± 5.6%, VO2 peak 4.6 ± 0.6 L · min-1) completed two experimental trials. The VL trial alternated between 3 min at 45% Wmax and 3 min at 85% Wmax until completion of the 63 min trial. The CL trial cycled at a constant 65% Wmax for 63 min. Following each trial, participants completed a self-paced 10 km time trial. Blood lactate was measured at the beginning, 6, 30, and 60 min, and conclusion of the trial. RESULTS: There was no difference between VL and CL performance trials (16.97 ± 2.07 min, 16.81 ± 1.47 min, respectively p = 0.62), VO2 (3.62 ± 0.71, 3.68 ± 0.66 L · min-1, respectively, p = 0.43), HR (160 ± 12, 161 ± 12 bpm, respectively, p = 0.64), blood lactate (10.4 ± 4.2, 9.2 ± 5.1 mmol · L-1, respectively, p = 0.52), RPE (18 ± 2, 18 ± 2, respectively, p = 0.22), Feeling Scale (9 ± 2, 9 ± 1, respectively, p = 0.63), or Attentional Focus (2 ± 2, 2 ± 2, respectively, p = 0.32). CONCLUSION: These data indicate that when overall work is held constant, despite different intensity profiles, there is no impact on acute measures of performance, physiology, or perception.