Presentation Title

Women in Substance Abuse Treatment

Advisor Information

Jeanette Harder

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

In 2012, 6.9 percent of United States females 12 years or older reported current illicit drug use (“Results from the 2012 national survey on drug use and health,” 2012); this is an increase from 6.6% of women in 2009 (“Women, girls, families, and substance abuse,” 2012). When compared to men, women often face additional barriers to accessing treatment. Women in substance abuse treatment are more likely than men to have children, be unemployed, and be more easily influenced by negative partner or friend relationships. Despite these barriers, women who complete treatment are equally or more likely than men to remain abstinent (Green, 2005). This study analyzed pre and posttest data from the Self-Sufficiency Matrix tool for 53 women in the Community Supports Program at Catholic Charities of Omaha. The researcher found a statistically significant and positive relationship between the percent of service goals clients completed and the Self-Sufficiency Matrix change scores; supporting the belief that women who complete treatment have better outcomes than women who do not. The researcher also examined the relationship between a women’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix score for levels of childcare and substance abuse at intake and what percent of the treatment goals they completed by discharge. The presentation will include policy and research recommendations including local female specific barriers to treatment completion and possible methods of improving female treatment retention.

Comments

Winner of Best Graduate Poster Presentation

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Women in Substance Abuse Treatment

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

In 2012, 6.9 percent of United States females 12 years or older reported current illicit drug use (“Results from the 2012 national survey on drug use and health,” 2012); this is an increase from 6.6% of women in 2009 (“Women, girls, families, and substance abuse,” 2012). When compared to men, women often face additional barriers to accessing treatment. Women in substance abuse treatment are more likely than men to have children, be unemployed, and be more easily influenced by negative partner or friend relationships. Despite these barriers, women who complete treatment are equally or more likely than men to remain abstinent (Green, 2005). This study analyzed pre and posttest data from the Self-Sufficiency Matrix tool for 53 women in the Community Supports Program at Catholic Charities of Omaha. The researcher found a statistically significant and positive relationship between the percent of service goals clients completed and the Self-Sufficiency Matrix change scores; supporting the belief that women who complete treatment have better outcomes than women who do not. The researcher also examined the relationship between a women’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix score for levels of childcare and substance abuse at intake and what percent of the treatment goals they completed by discharge. The presentation will include policy and research recommendations including local female specific barriers to treatment completion and possible methods of improving female treatment retention.