Presentation Title

Notorious: A Case Study of Marketing and Management Practices in Two Terrorist Organizations

Advisor Information

Gina Ligon

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Terrorism is a complex issue that demands examination from multiple frameworks. By applying empirical research from marketing and management literature to two historical cases of violent extremist organizations, we were able to understand much more about the “business of terrorism.” While knowing what keeps violent extremist groups going is important, uncovering what led to their downfall is equally, if not more, important. In this study, I used a dataset of historical information previously collected through a grant funded by Department of Homeland Security to add to my own research into the Weathermen Underground and the Japanese Red Army. Using a case study design I applied notoriety (i.e., firm reputation) variables to these violent extremist organizations to determine the similarities and differences in their rise and fall from their height of power. For both organizations, I found that organizational branding was the greatest source of success; however, by creating a highly centralized structure the Japanese Red Army was better able to direct members to a strategic goal. Ultimately, the deterioration of their organizational structures led both groups to collapse. By examining these organizations, I determined that organizational strategies such as creating a unique “brand,” as well as hierarchical structure of operations play significant roles in the overall success of a terrorist organization.

Comments

Winner of Outstanding Undergraduate Poster Presentation

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Notorious: A Case Study of Marketing and Management Practices in Two Terrorist Organizations

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Terrorism is a complex issue that demands examination from multiple frameworks. By applying empirical research from marketing and management literature to two historical cases of violent extremist organizations, we were able to understand much more about the “business of terrorism.” While knowing what keeps violent extremist groups going is important, uncovering what led to their downfall is equally, if not more, important. In this study, I used a dataset of historical information previously collected through a grant funded by Department of Homeland Security to add to my own research into the Weathermen Underground and the Japanese Red Army. Using a case study design I applied notoriety (i.e., firm reputation) variables to these violent extremist organizations to determine the similarities and differences in their rise and fall from their height of power. For both organizations, I found that organizational branding was the greatest source of success; however, by creating a highly centralized structure the Japanese Red Army was better able to direct members to a strategic goal. Ultimately, the deterioration of their organizational structures led both groups to collapse. By examining these organizations, I determined that organizational strategies such as creating a unique “brand,” as well as hierarchical structure of operations play significant roles in the overall success of a terrorist organization.