Presentation Title

The Relationship Between a Progressive vs. Single-Stage Treadmill Test For Evaluation of Claudication

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is defined by atherosclerotic plaque buildup and subsequent blockages in the arteries of the lower extremities,1 causing reduced blood flow to the legs during exertion, and leg pain known as claudication. Two different treadmill-walking tests are administered to examine claudication: a single-stage, and a progressive walking test. Previously no attempts have been made to determine a relationship between these two different protocols. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the single-stage test and the progressive test, with the goal of being able to make comparisons between the two tests for clinical purposes. Thirty-one patients with PAD (age: 65.2±6.71 years; height: 175.6±6.1 cm; mass: 87.5±15.6 kg) were recruited and gave consent for this study. Participants initially performed a progressive test at 2.0 miles per hour. The slope grade started at 0% incline and increased 2% every 2 minutes. Subjects walked until the pain forced them to stop. Following rest, participants performed a single-stage test at 1.5 mph, with the slope at a constant grade of 10%. Mechanical work from each test was calculated for all subjects. Pearson product moment correlation between calculated mechanical work for single-stage and progressive tests were determined. Maximum walk time and mechanical work both yielded a significant relationship, but graphical examination led to questions of clinical utility. However, a log transformation of work yielded a significant, strong relationship with a strong linear trend. Less than reliable relationship existed for time and mechanical work, but removal of nonlinearities through log transformation yields strong relationship with strong linear trend.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

The Relationship Between a Progressive vs. Single-Stage Treadmill Test For Evaluation of Claudication

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is defined by atherosclerotic plaque buildup and subsequent blockages in the arteries of the lower extremities,1 causing reduced blood flow to the legs during exertion, and leg pain known as claudication. Two different treadmill-walking tests are administered to examine claudication: a single-stage, and a progressive walking test. Previously no attempts have been made to determine a relationship between these two different protocols. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the single-stage test and the progressive test, with the goal of being able to make comparisons between the two tests for clinical purposes. Thirty-one patients with PAD (age: 65.2±6.71 years; height: 175.6±6.1 cm; mass: 87.5±15.6 kg) were recruited and gave consent for this study. Participants initially performed a progressive test at 2.0 miles per hour. The slope grade started at 0% incline and increased 2% every 2 minutes. Subjects walked until the pain forced them to stop. Following rest, participants performed a single-stage test at 1.5 mph, with the slope at a constant grade of 10%. Mechanical work from each test was calculated for all subjects. Pearson product moment correlation between calculated mechanical work for single-stage and progressive tests were determined. Maximum walk time and mechanical work both yielded a significant relationship, but graphical examination led to questions of clinical utility. However, a log transformation of work yielded a significant, strong relationship with a strong linear trend. Less than reliable relationship existed for time and mechanical work, but removal of nonlinearities through log transformation yields strong relationship with strong linear trend.