Presentation Title

Effectiveness of nascent methods in science pedagogy in the undergraduate classroom

Advisor Information

Christine Cutucache

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

Currently, a need exists in higher education to adopt more modeling activities into the standard curriculum. These activities are structured toward assisting students in the comprehension of the basic theories and emergent properties occurring in real-time. This study aims to measure the effectiveness of the Cell Collective, a dynamic web-based modeling platform, as a learning tool serving as a supplement both inside and outside of the laboratory. The Cell Collective, a real-time modeling software, was introduced into two different university courses: an undergraduate Microbiology course, and a graduate on-line Immunology course. Students were interviewed for feedback related to use of the Cell Collective and asked to complete a survey at the completion of the course. The student feedback was analyzed and deconstructed into positive, negative, and suggestion elements. Seventy-five percent of students self-reported that the Cell Collective positively contributed to their material comprehension. Therefore, we have ongoing studies investigating the specific ways to provide greater academic benefit to students using the Cell Collective. Moving forward, the student feedback will allow for improvements to future implementations of the Cell Collective. These improvements will grant students a greater chance to utilize the Cell Collective as an effective learning tool.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

Effectiveness of nascent methods in science pedagogy in the undergraduate classroom

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Currently, a need exists in higher education to adopt more modeling activities into the standard curriculum. These activities are structured toward assisting students in the comprehension of the basic theories and emergent properties occurring in real-time. This study aims to measure the effectiveness of the Cell Collective, a dynamic web-based modeling platform, as a learning tool serving as a supplement both inside and outside of the laboratory. The Cell Collective, a real-time modeling software, was introduced into two different university courses: an undergraduate Microbiology course, and a graduate on-line Immunology course. Students were interviewed for feedback related to use of the Cell Collective and asked to complete a survey at the completion of the course. The student feedback was analyzed and deconstructed into positive, negative, and suggestion elements. Seventy-five percent of students self-reported that the Cell Collective positively contributed to their material comprehension. Therefore, we have ongoing studies investigating the specific ways to provide greater academic benefit to students using the Cell Collective. Moving forward, the student feedback will allow for improvements to future implementations of the Cell Collective. These improvements will grant students a greater chance to utilize the Cell Collective as an effective learning tool.