Presentation Title

Thermoregulatory and performance differences between treadmill and overground running

Advisor Information

Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

7-3-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Overground running requires higher energy expenditure than treadmill running at the same velocity due to the cost of overcoming air resistance. To account for this, it is commonly recommended to run on a treadmill at 1% grade to ensure the run is metabolically equivalent. PURPOSE: To determine differences in performance and thermoregulation between treadmill and overground running. METHODS: Male runners (n = 10, age 32 ± 6 y) completed two 10 km time trials in a randomized, counter-balanced order on separate days: one on a treadmill (TM) at 1% grade, and one on a 200 m indoor track (IT). Core temperature, skin temperature, RPE, and heart rate were monitored during the run. RESULTS: Participants completed the 10 km time trial faster during TM (40.10 ± 6.06 min) than IT (41.66 ± 5.86 min, p < 0.001). Core temperature was higher during IT (38.8 ± 0.4 °C) than TM (38.6 ± 0.5 °C, p = 0.021), while skin temperature was lower during IT (32.7 ± 2.9 °C) than TM (34.9 ± 2.4 °C, p = 0.002). There were no differences between IT and TM in RPE (15 ± 2 vs. 15 ± 1, respectively) or HR (174 ± 13 vs. 178 ± 13, respectively). CONCLUSION: Participants are able to complete a 10 km time trial more quickly on a treadmill than a 200 m indoor track despite a similar HR and RPE and a less favorable thermodynamic gradient between the core and skin in TM.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 7th, 9:00 AM Mar 7th, 12:00 PM

Thermoregulatory and performance differences between treadmill and overground running

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Overground running requires higher energy expenditure than treadmill running at the same velocity due to the cost of overcoming air resistance. To account for this, it is commonly recommended to run on a treadmill at 1% grade to ensure the run is metabolically equivalent. PURPOSE: To determine differences in performance and thermoregulation between treadmill and overground running. METHODS: Male runners (n = 10, age 32 ± 6 y) completed two 10 km time trials in a randomized, counter-balanced order on separate days: one on a treadmill (TM) at 1% grade, and one on a 200 m indoor track (IT). Core temperature, skin temperature, RPE, and heart rate were monitored during the run. RESULTS: Participants completed the 10 km time trial faster during TM (40.10 ± 6.06 min) than IT (41.66 ± 5.86 min, p < 0.001). Core temperature was higher during IT (38.8 ± 0.4 °C) than TM (38.6 ± 0.5 °C, p = 0.021), while skin temperature was lower during IT (32.7 ± 2.9 °C) than TM (34.9 ± 2.4 °C, p = 0.002). There were no differences between IT and TM in RPE (15 ± 2 vs. 15 ± 1, respectively) or HR (174 ± 13 vs. 178 ± 13, respectively). CONCLUSION: Participants are able to complete a 10 km time trial more quickly on a treadmill than a 200 m indoor track despite a similar HR and RPE and a less favorable thermodynamic gradient between the core and skin in TM.