Presentation Title

Engaging Online Citizens in Civic Works-A Flow Theory Based Approach

Advisor Information

Gert Jan de Vreede

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

Online collaborative problem solving (OCPS) refers to the use of social web technologies to garner netizens’ collective effort for problem solving and innovation tasks. The model has enabled government agencies to involve citizens in civic works at large scale. However, success of this kind of initiatives depends much on, among other things, user engagement, or the quality of effort online users devote to OCPS activities that contribute directly to desired outcomes. We argue that an important influence on user engagement in OCPS events is their experience when participating in the events. We further argue that Flow Theory by Csikszentmihalyi and Csikszentmihalyi (1988) provides much insight on how to improve this experience. In addition, we propose to measure the psychological construct “flow” through a novel physiological-psychometric approach. We validate our hypotheses in a lab experiment.

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COinS
 
Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

Engaging Online Citizens in Civic Works-A Flow Theory Based Approach

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Online collaborative problem solving (OCPS) refers to the use of social web technologies to garner netizens’ collective effort for problem solving and innovation tasks. The model has enabled government agencies to involve citizens in civic works at large scale. However, success of this kind of initiatives depends much on, among other things, user engagement, or the quality of effort online users devote to OCPS activities that contribute directly to desired outcomes. We argue that an important influence on user engagement in OCPS events is their experience when participating in the events. We further argue that Flow Theory by Csikszentmihalyi and Csikszentmihalyi (1988) provides much insight on how to improve this experience. In addition, we propose to measure the psychological construct “flow” through a novel physiological-psychometric approach. We validate our hypotheses in a lab experiment.