Presentation Title

Effectiveness of Antimicrobial Peptide DASamP2 on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Advisor Information

Donald Rowen

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

As antibiotic resistant pathogens continue to become an increasing threat to public and patient health, there is an increasing need for new treatment options. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are becoming a promising replacement for conventional antibiotics because AMPs are capable of killing a wide variety of bacterial stains, even the widely known and feared MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus). Recently a new peptide (DASamP2), developed by Dr. Wang at UNMC, has shown to be effective against both Gram-positive Staphyloccous aureus and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To future characterize this AMP against P. aeruginosa, we examined how long it takes to kill P. aeruginosa and how quickly the bacteria can develop resistance upon repeated exposure. We observed that it killed in P. aeruginosa in less than fifteen minutes at low concentrations, and nearly instantly at higher concentrations. It also took longer to naturally acquire resistance to the AMP in contrast to conventional antibiotic treatments (gentamycin). These results support the idea that DSamp2 is a promising AMP worthy of future study.

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Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

Effectiveness of Antimicrobial Peptide DASamP2 on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

As antibiotic resistant pathogens continue to become an increasing threat to public and patient health, there is an increasing need for new treatment options. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are becoming a promising replacement for conventional antibiotics because AMPs are capable of killing a wide variety of bacterial stains, even the widely known and feared MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus). Recently a new peptide (DASamP2), developed by Dr. Wang at UNMC, has shown to be effective against both Gram-positive Staphyloccous aureus and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To future characterize this AMP against P. aeruginosa, we examined how long it takes to kill P. aeruginosa and how quickly the bacteria can develop resistance upon repeated exposure. We observed that it killed in P. aeruginosa in less than fifteen minutes at low concentrations, and nearly instantly at higher concentrations. It also took longer to naturally acquire resistance to the AMP in contrast to conventional antibiotic treatments (gentamycin). These results support the idea that DSamp2 is a promising AMP worthy of future study.