Presentation Title

Metabolic Response of Nebraskan Anurans To A Warming Climate

Advisor Information

James Wilson

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to provide needed information on the thermal requirements of Nebraska’s common amphibians. Change in the thermal regime of ectothermic species that utilize seasonal torpor (hibernation) is of major concern. Increased global temperatures will cause ectothermic species to be exposed to warmer temperatures, altering their metabolic profile. We used common frogs and toads indigenous to Nebraska to measure their metabolic response to ambient temperatures. We hypothesize that the metabolic rates of frogs and toads will increase with increased ambient temperature. Because their metabolic rate is tied to ambient temperature, any increase in ambient temperature, as is being predicted, would lead to increased energy usage during hibernation. Data collected will provide critical information on the response of ectothermic species to climate change. To test our hypothesis, we collected frogs and toads from Omaha, Nebraska and ran each individual in a metabolic chamber (Sable Systems) at various ambient temperatures. The metabolic chamber measures the production of carbon dioxide in the test individual to determine metabolic rate. A regression of metabolic rate and ambient temperature will be generated to calculate the slope of the regression line for each frog and toad species. Comparison of slopes between both species will determine if the rate of metabolic change is different between species. We expect species with a higher slope will be more susceptible to increase temperatures associated with climate change. The analysis and results will be complete February 2014.

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Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

Metabolic Response of Nebraskan Anurans To A Warming Climate

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The purpose of this study is to provide needed information on the thermal requirements of Nebraska’s common amphibians. Change in the thermal regime of ectothermic species that utilize seasonal torpor (hibernation) is of major concern. Increased global temperatures will cause ectothermic species to be exposed to warmer temperatures, altering their metabolic profile. We used common frogs and toads indigenous to Nebraska to measure their metabolic response to ambient temperatures. We hypothesize that the metabolic rates of frogs and toads will increase with increased ambient temperature. Because their metabolic rate is tied to ambient temperature, any increase in ambient temperature, as is being predicted, would lead to increased energy usage during hibernation. Data collected will provide critical information on the response of ectothermic species to climate change. To test our hypothesis, we collected frogs and toads from Omaha, Nebraska and ran each individual in a metabolic chamber (Sable Systems) at various ambient temperatures. The metabolic chamber measures the production of carbon dioxide in the test individual to determine metabolic rate. A regression of metabolic rate and ambient temperature will be generated to calculate the slope of the regression line for each frog and toad species. Comparison of slopes between both species will determine if the rate of metabolic change is different between species. We expect species with a higher slope will be more susceptible to increase temperatures associated with climate change. The analysis and results will be complete February 2014.