Presentation Title

Effectiveness of Target Language Acquisition Methodology When Used with Spanish Speaking Parents of Deaf Children

Advisor Information

Julie Delkamiller

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 1:15 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 1:30 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this research project was to assess the methods included in the first American Sign Language (ASL) curriculum for Spanish Speaking parents and guardians. Until last year, there was no curriculum available for Spanish speaking adults to learn American Sign Language. Spanish speaking parents of children with deafness or hearing impairments were tasked to learn ASL on their own in an unfamiliar language, English. Using second language acquisition methods I designed the aforementioned curriculum to facilitate the acquisition of ASL for this demographic. These lessons were then taught once a week over a nine week period. To determine if this curriculum was successful and if so, what factors lead to its success data was collected on the following parameters: knowledge of ASL prior to the class, level of receptive and productive signing skills in a pre, mid, and posttest, anxiety regarding the class, and hours practiced outside of class. After analyzing these factors, it was concluded that the curriculum was successful. The average score on the pretest consisting of basic vocabulary needed to communicate with a child you are caring for was a 50% level of accuracy. When the same vocabulary was presented at the end of the course as a posttest the average score was 90% level of accuracy. This signifies an 87% increase in accuracy was attained by using this prescribed curriculum. Success was also measured in qualitative data like the satisfaction the parents exhibited when being able to completely express themselves to their children.

Comments

Winner of Best Undergraduate Oral Presentation

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 1:15 PM Mar 6th, 1:30 PM

Effectiveness of Target Language Acquisition Methodology When Used with Spanish Speaking Parents of Deaf Children

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

The purpose of this research project was to assess the methods included in the first American Sign Language (ASL) curriculum for Spanish Speaking parents and guardians. Until last year, there was no curriculum available for Spanish speaking adults to learn American Sign Language. Spanish speaking parents of children with deafness or hearing impairments were tasked to learn ASL on their own in an unfamiliar language, English. Using second language acquisition methods I designed the aforementioned curriculum to facilitate the acquisition of ASL for this demographic. These lessons were then taught once a week over a nine week period. To determine if this curriculum was successful and if so, what factors lead to its success data was collected on the following parameters: knowledge of ASL prior to the class, level of receptive and productive signing skills in a pre, mid, and posttest, anxiety regarding the class, and hours practiced outside of class. After analyzing these factors, it was concluded that the curriculum was successful. The average score on the pretest consisting of basic vocabulary needed to communicate with a child you are caring for was a 50% level of accuracy. When the same vocabulary was presented at the end of the course as a posttest the average score was 90% level of accuracy. This signifies an 87% increase in accuracy was attained by using this prescribed curriculum. Success was also measured in qualitative data like the satisfaction the parents exhibited when being able to completely express themselves to their children.